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Michigan boy, 13, kills himself after being bullied on school bus, mom says

A 13-year-old boy in Michigan committed suicide last month after being relentlessly bullied on his school bus, his mother told local news media.

Michael Martin, an eighth-grade student at Everett High School, died Jan. 25 at a hospital two days after he attempted suicide at his home in Lansing, the Lansing State Journal reported.

BOY, 10, KILLS HIMSELF AFTER BEING BULLIED FOR WEARING COLOSTOMY BAG: MOM

Martin was tormented on the school bus over his weight, glasses and braces in the months leading to his death, his mother, Joanna Wohlfert, told the paper. Wohlfert said her son missed 33 days of school since September due to bullying.

Wohlfert told the paper she had reached out to the Lansing School District and the bus company that services the district, Dean Transportation, but both failed to investigate the alleged bullying.

“I know that some schools are overwhelmed with kids, but if you have a parent that’s reaching out to you, and trying to get help for their child, why wouldn’t you reach back?” Wohlfert told the paper. “Why wouldn’t you do something? He was going through a dark time and nobody cared. Nobody paid attention to him.”

“He was going through a dark time and nobody cared. Nobody paid attention to him.”

— Joanna Wohlfert, Michael’s mother

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Lansing School District spokesman Bob Kolt told the paper on Friday that school staff responded appropriately to the bullying reports. He wouldn’t comment further because the district is investigating the boy’s death. The school bus company released a statement offering condolences to the family and said it is in communication with the school district

Lansing police are investigating bullying related to Michael’s death.

Virginia governor’s medical school found a pattern of inappropriate yearbook photos

Virginia governor embroiled in blackface controversy

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Virginia governor embroiled in blackface controversy 03:07

(CNN)The president of Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam’s medical school said that other yearbooks had a number of photos that were “shockingly abhorrent” and inappropriate, including as recently as 2013.

“There’s been a pattern,” Eastern Virginia Medical School President and Provost Richard V. Homan said on Tuesday. “Some are repugnant. Some are unprofessional. Some are shockingly abhorrent, like I mentioned.”
Homan said when he was informed about inappropriate images in the 2013 yearbook, he decided to discontinue the yearbooks. None have been made since that year.
Homan spoke days after the discovery of a racist photograph that appeared on Northam’s page in the 1984 medical school yearbook. The photograph shows one person dressed in blackface and another in the KKK’s signature white hood and robes.
    Northam initially apologized for the photo and said he was in it, but in a news conference Saturday, he denied that he was in the image and said he would not resign as governor.
    “I believe now and then that I am not either of the people in this photo,” Northam said.
    However, he did admit that he had put shoe polish on his face to resemble Michael Jackson in a dance contest in 1984.
    “I look back now and regret that I did not understand the harmful legacy of an action like that,” he said.
    Democrats in Virginia and across the country have called on Northam to resign and allow Justin Fairfax, Northam’s 39-year-old African-American lieutenant governor, to take his place.

    External investigation will look into school culture

    Former Virginia Attorney General Richard Cullen will lead a third-party investigation to examine past yearbooks and to look into the culture of the medical school, the school said.
    “This investigation will be fully independent, it will not be restricted in scope, it will be fully transparent,” Vice Rector Mark Warden said. “We are committed to finding the truth.”
    Homan apologized to the African-American community, saying “the emotional wounds they endure are enormous.” He said that the issue was about the institution, and not any individual students.
    “I do not need a report to know this situation was the ultimate responsibility of our institution, EVMS, and not our students,” he said.
    Homan said he did not know if the image on Northam’s page was indeed him. He also said he had not had any contact with any of the yearbook staff from that year.
    CNN has reported that the 1984 yearbook has other racist photos, including a photo of three men with their faces blackened wearing white dresses, white gloves, pearls and wigs.
    Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion Mekbib Gemeda said diversity has improved over the last 6 years. The schools has doubled the number of minorities in the MD program in the past 2 years — reaching 20% of the last two classes — and has increased the number of underrepresented minorities in their other programs. They have also established a mentoring community, Gemeda said.
      Dr. William Elwood, who worked with others on the layout for the 1984 yearbook, told CNN that photos for personal pages were chosen by the individual student.
      “They were submitted in a sealed envelope with their name on it to the yearbook staff, to be put on their page,” Elwood told CNN.

      Covington high school student, lawyers prepare for possible libel fight, release video of ‘the truth’

      More than 50 media organizations, celebrities and politicians were sent letters from lawyers representing the Covington Catholic High School student seen in a controversial viral video — the first step in a possible libel and defamation lawsuit — and the teen’s legal team also released a 15-minute video that they say shows “the truth” about his interactions at last month’s March For Life.

      Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., actors Alyssa Milano and Jim Carey, media organizations CNN, the New York Times and the Washington Post and the Diocese of Covington were among the dozens recently sent preservation letters, the text of which advised the parties not to destroy any documents in connection with the case. The Cincinnati Inquirer first reported on Friday the initial list of organizations, and attorney Todd McMurtry confirmed to Fox News on Monday that more organizations or individuals could also receive letters.

      “It’s an enormous pool of possible defendants,” he said, adding only one party had responded to the letter, though he did not say which.

      COVINGTON BISHOP APOLOGIZES FOR PREMATURELY CONDEMNING STUDENTS IN VIRAL INCIDENT WITH NATIVE AMERICAN ELDER

      McMurtry, of the Hemmer DeFrank Wessels law firm in Ft. Mitchell, Kentucky, is part of the legal team representing Nick Sandmann, the Kentucky teenager vilified online after a viral video widely misrepresented him allegedly harassing a Native American man following a pro-life demonstration on Jan. 18 at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

      The incident sparked massive and widespread criticisms of Sandmann, who was seen in a brief snippet of the encounter smiling while standing in front of activist Nathan Phillips, and Sandmann’s classmates.

      COVINGTON HIGH SCHOOL TEENS, FAMILIES FIGHT BACK

      Subsequent videos revealed the students – some, including Sandmann, wearing red “Make America Great Again” hats – were actually accosted and yelled at before Phillips and other Native American activists approached them. Another group – the so-called Black Hebrew Israelites – were heard and seen shouting at the students.

      Both school officials and the Native Americans involved have said they’ve received death threats since the encounter.

      KENTUCKY STUDENT SEEN IN VIRAL CONFRONTATION WITH NATIVE AMERICAN SPEAKS OUT

      McMurtry told the Inquirer the aftermath of the incident “permanently stained [Nick’s reputation]” and that the organizations and individuals addressed in the letters may have defamed or libeled Nick with false reporting.

      He told Fox News that not everyone who received the letter could be called to defend themselves in a court, but that they have basis to believe that they could be sued. He added the documents that should be preserved for any future litigation include any drafts of stories, emails between colleagues discussing the incident, and, for celebrities and individuals, any tweets or statements sent to the public.

      A spokeswoman for the Covington Diocese declined to comment. Emails to other organizations and individuals were not immediately returned.

      KENTUCKY TEEN IN VIRAL VIDEO SAYS HE DID NOTHING PROVOCATIVE: ‘I HAD EVERY RIGHT’ TO STAND THERE

      In addition to the letters, Sandmann’s legal team – which includes L. Lin Wood, a nationally-recognized attorney in the fields of libel, defamation and the First Amendment – also released a 15-minute video they say show “the truth” of what happened at the March for Life event.

      “2 weeks ago, the mainstream media, politicians, church officials, commentators & celebrities rushed to judgment to wrongfully condemn, threaten, disparage & vilify Nick Sandmann based solely on a few seconds of an out-of-context video clip. It only takes 15 minutes to learn the truth,” the video description, posted on YouTube, stated.

      On Twitter, Wood added: “Some say a 15-minute video is too long to go viral. Will we allow incomplete 30-second video clips to be basis for agenda-driven false accusations & threats against a 16-year old student? Please share the full truth about what was done to Nick Sandmann.”

      Wood did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment Monday.

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      “For the mob to just go tear apart a 16-year-old boy is inexcusable,” McMurtry told the Inquirer. “He’ll never be able to get away from this.”

      School official quits after charges she pretended sick student was her son to get him treatment

      Casey Smitherman turned herself in to the Madison County Sheriff's Office.

      Casey Smitherman turned herself in to the Madison County Sheriff's Office.

      (CNN)An Indiana school superintendent has resigned after being accused of pretending a sick student was her son so he could get medical treatment, CNN affiliate WXIN reported.

      Casey Smitherman, the superintendent of Elwood Community Schools, was charged January 23 with official misconduct, insurance fraud, insurance application fraud and identity deception. She officially resigned Friday.
      In a statement to the affiliate, she said:
      “I have dedicated my entire professional career to children and ensuring they have the best possible chance of success. My record of accomplishments clearly shows I have been successful in doing that. Unfortunately, my recent lapse in judgment has brought negative attention to the community and myself. I am very embarrassed for that, and I apologize to the board, the community and the teachers and students of Elwood Community Schools.
        “I sincerely hope this single lapse in judgment does not tarnish all of the good work I’ve done for students over the span of my career. As most educators will attest, the board, community, teachers and students need to be in alignment for a school system to achieve its goals. I do not feel that alignment exists at this time nor could exist in the near future and therefore, effective 02/01/2019, I am resigning from my position as the Superintendent of Elwood Community Schools. I am confident the board will take the necessary steps to ensure the school system works through this period of change in the best possible way.”
        Smitherman noticed the 15-year-old student was missing from school on January 9 and checked on him at his house, where she decided he needed to see a doctor because of a sore throat.
        She took him to an emergency clinic but was denied service because the child was a minor and she wasn’t his guardian. At another clinic, she checked him in using her son’s name and insurance and received a prescription for medications, which she picked up at a pharmacy before taking him home.
        The student’s guardian contacted the Elwood Police Department on January 16 about the student receiving the medical treatment. According to police documents, the student tore the label off the medicine bottle because “he knew it was wrong.”
        Smitherman told police that in the past she and her husband bought clothes for the student and helped clean his house. She said she didn’t want to contact the Department of Child Services for fear the boy would be placed in foster care.
          Smitherman’s attorney, Bryan Williams, said she has entered in a diversion program that will dismiss her charges if she doesn’t get arrested in a year.
          The school district, about 47 miles north of Indianapolis, has more than 1,600 students in grades K-12 with another 200 students in the preschool program, according to the school district website.

          Other racist photos found in Northam’s medical school yearbook

          Governor says he darkened face once, not in yearbook photo

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          Governor says he darkened face once, not in yearbook photo 01:25

          (CNN)During a free-wheeling press conference to address a racist photo on his medical school yearbook page, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam said he wouldn’t be surprised if other photos like that were found in the 1984 Eastern Virginia Medical School yearbook.

          On Sunday, CNN found more racist and objectionable images in the book. None of them appear to show Northam.
          Democrats from across the nation demanded Northam resign after a yearbook photo surfaced showing one person wearing blackface and another dressed in the Ku Klux Klan’s signature white hood and robes. The photo appears on Northam’s personal yearbook page among other photos of him from school.
          After first apologizing for appearing in the racist photo, Northam now says he wasn’t in it and won’t resign.
            In that same yearbook, CNN found the following images:
            Virginia Governor Ralph Northam, flanked by his wife Pam, speaks at a news conference Saturday.

            Virginia Governor Ralph Northam, flanked by his wife Pam, speaks at a news conference Saturday.

            — On page 10 of the yearbook, a photo shows a man dressed up like a woman in a lowcut white dress, pearls, a black wig and blackface. Next to the photo is the caption, “‘Baby Love’, who ever thought Diana Ross would make it to medical school” — an apparent reference to the lead singer of the Supremes, a Motown singing group made up of three black women. A woman behind him is wearing a hat as if she is dressed like a witch. The photo is on a page full of photos of other student outings and parties.
            — Later in the yearbook, in a section devoted to student personal pages, a photo of three men with their faces blackened wearing white dresses, white gloves, pearls and wigs appears. That photo appears on the page before Northam’s personal page. It is surrounded by other photos of this student at school and has no captions.
            — On page 34, the pharmacology page, a photo of a white man, not in blackface, shows him holding a coffee mug bearing the words, “We can’t get fired! Slaves have to be sold.”
            — On page 10, there’s also a photo of a man groping a mannequin with the words “I try never to divulge my true feelings while examining my patients.”
            CNN is not publishing the images, pending comment or confirmation from the individuals pictured.
            Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam's page in his 1984 Eastern Virginia Medical School yearbook. The page includes a picture, at right, of a person in blackface and another wearing a Ku Klux Klan hood. It's unclear who the people in the picture are, but the rest of the page is filled with pictures of Northam, and lists his undergraduate alma mater and other information about him.

            Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam's page in his 1984 Eastern Virginia Medical School yearbook. The page includes a picture, at right, of a person in blackface and another wearing a Ku Klux Klan hood. It's unclear who the people in the picture are, but the rest of the page is filled with pictures of Northam, and lists his undergraduate alma mater and other information about him.

            Black student: ‘I never found Ralph to be a racist’

            CNN’s Sara Sidner spoke to one of two black classmates, Walter Broadnax, shown in the 1984 yearbook. He said he had a good experience at the medical school in Norfolk.
            “There was no issue. The faculty was great. I have never seen any of that at all at any party or anything like that,” he said. “We all got along. I don’t know what the deal is behind all of this.”
            When asked how he reacted upon seeing the photo of people dressed in blackface and wearing a Klan uniform, Broadnax said, “It shocked the hell out of me. The whole thing is just frustrating. Hell, it was 1984, nobody did any of that stuff as far as I knew at the time.”
            Speaking about Northam specifically, Broadnax said, “I never found Ralph to be a racist. He was just like everybody else.”

            ‘Clearly racist and offensive’

            The conservative website Big League Politics first reported the photo of the person dressed like a Klansman and the person in blackface.
            On Friday, the governor confirmed he was one of the people pictured and issued an apology, calling the costumes “clearly racist and offensive.”
            But on Saturday, he called a news conference to say he does not believe he is either person in the photograph.
            While further denouncing racism, he admitted that in 1984 he entered a dance contest and darkened his face so he’d look like Michael Jackson.
            “I had the shoes, I had a glove, and I used just a little bit of shoe polish to put under my — or on my — cheeks,” he said. “And the reason I used a very little bit is because, I don’t know if anybody’s ever tried that, but you cannot get shoe polish off.”
            “I look back now and regret that I did not understand the harmful legacy of an action like that,” he added.
            Blackface was used in the mid-19th century by white actors in minstrel shows to depict false stereotypes of black people.
            The characters were used to mock, dehumanize and present African-Americans as inferior in every way possible.
            Northam also said Saturday that he’s not resigning and would only leave if he thought he could not govern effectively. He has said he would be in regular contact with leaders throughout the state to gauge that question.
            On Sunday, a source with direct knowledge of the governor’s thinking told CNN Northam has not changed his mind.
            Northam invited a group of top administration officials of color, including some cabinet secretaries, to a meeting Sunday night to discuss the issues surrounding the release of the racist photo in his medical school yearbook, according to two sources, including one inside the administration.
            The meeting was first reported by BuzzFeed News.
            Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax did not attend the meeting, a person close to Fairfax told CNN. Fairfax, who is black, is in line to become governor if Northam steps aside.
              A spokesperson for the governor told CNN they would not describe what happened at the meeting.
              Eastern Virginia Medical School President Richard V. Homan said in a statement Saturday he would call for an external investigation “to review all of our past yearbooks, determine the processes for publishing those yearbooks; discover what, if any, administrative oversight was exercised; examine our campus culture; and provide recommendations for future actions.”

              South Carolina high school football player and honor roll student killed in drug deal gone bad, deputies say

              A tale of guns and drugs surrounds the shocking murder of a 16-year-old boy who attended a South Carolina high school where he was an honor student and member of the football team.

              An 18-year-old high school dropout and his alleged accomplice, a 16-year-old juvenile, have been charged with murder in the fatal shooting of Joshua Meeks, an 11th-grader at Mauldin High School in Greenville. He was shot and killed Tuesday. Greenville County deputies found his body dumped in another county two days later, according to reports Friday.

              The chilling discovery came after deputies found Joshua’s blood-splattered car in front of an apartment building in Greenville, according to the reports. Deputies said the building’s tenants included the dropout, Sosa Mandiez Croft.

              “During the course of investigation, investigators learned that Croft and the victim had engaged in some sort of drug deal prior to Croft stealing the victim’s car and ultimately shooting him,” the Greenville Sheriff’s Office said.

              MOTORCYCLE COP WHO SURVIVED SHOT IN FACE LAST YEAR IS KILLED IN COLLISION DURING FUNERAL PROCESSION

              On Friday, deputies charged Lyric Lawson, 18, of Greenville, with helping Croft dispose of the body, Fox Carolina reported. Lawson, Croft and the juvenile were all behind bars.

              Sosa Mandiez Croft, 18, (l.), has been charged with murder in last week's shooting death of Joshua Meeks, a 16-year-old high school football player in South Carolina. Lyric Lawson has been charged with helping Croft dumped Joshua's body. 

              Sosa Mandiez Croft, 18, (l.), has been charged with murder in last week’s shooting death of Joshua Meeks, a 16-year-old high school football player in South Carolina. Lyric Lawson has been charged with helping Croft dumped Joshua’s body.  (Greenville County Sheriff’s Office )

              The case began as a missing teen investigation Wednesday morning, according to reports.

              Joshua’s mom reported her son missing, telling deputies her son went out with friends around 9 p.m. Tuesday and never returned, the Greenville News reported.

              A Mauldin Police incident report says officers learned Joshua was going to meet a new drug dealer after conducting interviews with students, the paper reported.

              The coroner estimates Joshua was killed after 10 p.m. Tuesday, Fox Carolina reported.

              “Copious amounts” of blood covered the passenger seat in Joshua’s car when police found it, acording to the station.

              GEORGIA TEEN KILLS HIMSELF AFTER ACCIDENTALLY SHOOTING AND KILLING FRIEND: COPS

              At a bond hearing Thursday, Croft told Joshua’s family he was going to work with his lawyers to identify the “real killer,” according to the station.

              “I’m going to come clean,and put it all out there; and tell my involvement of the whole situation so ya’ll can have closure even though it can’t bring him back,” Croft was quoted as telling the family.

              Reports described Joshua as a popular student and teammate. He was a lineman on the offense.

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              “Today and the coming days will not be easy. Please continue to pray for the family of Josh Meeks, Mauldin High football coach Harry Cabaniss said on Twitter. “He was loved by all who knew him and will always be loved.”

              Indiana boy, 13, arrested after telling Siri he wanted to shoot up a school

              A teenage boy in Indiana was charged with intimidation after he told Apple’s assistant Siri that he had planned a school shooting and then posted a screenshot of the response online.

              The 13-year-old middle school student was being held at the Porter County Juvenile Detention Center, and investigators do not believe the boy had access to weapons, according to the Valparaiso Police Department.

              Valparaiso Police said in a statement on Thursday that the boy allegedly told Siri, “I am going to shoot up a school.”

              UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT STUDENT FOUND DEAD IN SNOW AFTER TAKING APPARENT SHORTCUT, POLICE SAY

              The digital assistant then created a list of several Valparaiso schools nearby.

              However, the student made no direct threat to a specific person, school or school system.

              “The threat is not believed to be credible at this time; however, these types of communications are taken very seriously by the Valparaiso Police Department and our community,” the Valparaiso Police Department said in its statement. “We continue to work with the Valparaiso Community Schools to ensure the safety of the students and staff.”

              He allegedly posted the screenshot on Thursday.

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              The incident was reported to police in nearby Chesterton by the boy’s social media contacts.

              The Associated Press contributed to this story. 

              Clinton, Ocasio-Cortez join Dem chorus calling for Northam to resign; medical school vows review of past yearbooks

              Hillary Clinton and U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Saturday night joined a host of other prominent Democrats in calling for Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam to resign amid a firestorm over a photo showing a man in blackface and another in Ku Klux Klan garb in his 1984 medical school yearbook page.

              “This has gone on too long. There is nothing to debate. He must resign,” Clinton wrote in a Twitter message.

              The former Democratic presidential nominee’s tweet included a retweet of a news story that said both of Virginia’s U.S. senators — including Clinton’s 2016 running mate, Tim Kaine — also had called on Northam to step down.

              And it came just a short time after a post by Ocasio-Cortez, the freshman congresswoman from New York.

              “Northam must resign, and those who try to help him stumble past this deserve scrutiny,” she wrote. “If you can’t understand how painful + eroding this is to American society, let alone the state of Virginia, take some time to read up this weekend.”

              Meanwhile on Saturday, the president of the Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, the school that Northam attended and that produced the yearbook, vowed to review its past yearbooks in wake of the Northam controversy.

              “In concert with our Board of Visitors’ leadership, I will direct that an external investigation be conducted as soon as possible to review all of our past yearbooks, determine the processes for publishing those yearbooks; discover what, if any, administrative oversight was exercised; examine our campus culture; and provide recommendations for future actions,” school President Dr. Richard Homan said in a statement posted to the school’s website.

              This image shows Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam’s page in his 1984 Eastern Virginia Medical School yearbook. (Eastern Virginia Medical School via AP)

              This image shows Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam’s page in his 1984 Eastern Virginia Medical School yearbook. (Eastern Virginia Medical School via AP)

              GOV. RALPH NORTHAM HAD QUESTIONABLE NICKNAME IN 1981 YEARBOOK

              “We will move quickly to assemble an appropriate panel to conduct this investigation — a panel of advocates for diversity and inclusion representative of our greater community, including African Americans and other people of color; a diverse panel that can apply a critical eye to this issue,” he added.

              Interviews conducted by the Virginian-Pilot of Norfolk with EVMS alumni indicated that students around the time the Democratic governor attended the school were each given a half-page to submit their own photos.

              “No one questioned me about my pictures,” Dr. Kathleen Lovie, who graduated in 1985 and practices medicine in Alabama, told the newspaper.

              TRUMP SLAMS RALPH NORTHAM YEARBOOK PHOTO CONTROVERSY AS BEING ‘UNFORGIVABLE’

              She said she remembered the yearbook being student-run.

              At a Saturday news conference, Northam resisted calls to resign, saying he did not appear in the 1984 yearbook photo, contradicting his earlier remarks where he apologized for the picture.

              “When I was confronted with the image, I was appalled that it appeared on my page, but I believed then and I believe now that I am not either of the people in that photograph,” he said at a news conference at the governor’s mansion.

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              Surgery Chairman Dr. L.D. Britt, who is black and was first hired at the school in 1986, said it was unfortunate that EVMS has been highlighted this way, the paper reported.

              “At the end of the day, somebody should have provided some oversight for that [photo] to have not been published,” he said.

              Eastern Virginia Medical School to investigate all past yearbooks after Northam controversy

              Governor says he darkened face once, not in yearbook photo

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              Governor says he darkened face once, not in yearbook photo 01:25

              (CNN)Eastern Virginia Medical School has promised an investigation into all past yearbooks in the wake of the controversy surrounding the state’s Gov. Ralph Northam.

              A racist photograph, which was obtained by CNN, appears in the medical school’s 1984 yearbook and shows one person dressed in blackface and another in the KKK’s signature white hood and robes. Northam, on Friday, confirmed he was one of the people pictured and issued an apology, calling the costumes “clearly racist and offensive.” But on Saturday, he said he does not believe he is either person in the photograph.
              Eastern Virginia Medical School President Richard V. Homan said in a statement Saturday he would call for an external investigation “to review all of our past yearbooks, determine the processes for publishing those yearbooks; discover what, if any, administrative oversight was exercised; examine our campus culture; and provide recommendations for future actions.”
              Homan said the panel for the investigation will include “advocates for diversity and inclusion representative of our greater community, including African Americans and other people of color.”
                “We commit to transparency and moving the investigation forward as quickly as possible,” he said.
                Earlier Saturday, Homan released a statement condemning the racist photo and issuing an apology on behalf of the medical school.
                “The picture is shockingly abhorrent and absolutely antithetical to the principles, morals and values we hold and espouse of our educational and research institution and our professions. Racism and discrimination in any form is not acceptable,” Homan’s statement read.
                Homan added that while past events cannot be changed, they can serve as “reminders of the importance of our ongoing work toward diversity and inclusion.”
                “We recognize the need to address and rectify any issues of racism and discrimination that arise, at any point — and will continue a long tradition of action to build a strong culture of diversity and inclusion,” Homan said.
                  Northam, a former pediatric neurosurgeon and Army doctor, won the governorship in 2017. Despite numerous calls for his resignation, Northam said he would try to win over those who want him out.
                  “I intend to continue doing the business of Virginia,” he said, adding that resigning would be the easier way out.

                  High school basketball team’s bus flips over, injuring at least 14; two ‘critical’: reports

                  At least two people were in critical condition and as many as 14 others suffered unspecified injuries Saturday night when a charter bus carrying a girls high school basketball team flipped over near a highway entrance ramp in Beckley, W.Va., according to reports.

                  The two critically injured patients have been flown to a trauma center, Beckley’s WVVA-TV reported.

                  Varying reports said a total of either 14 or 16 people had been injured. It was unclear how the accident happened or whether any other vehicles were involved.

                  IOWA CROWD’S RENDITION OF NATIONAL ANTHEM AT HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL GAME GOES VIRAL

                  The team was from Martinsburg High School and had played at the Big Atlantic Classic at the Beckley-Raleigh Convention Center, WVVA reported.

                  Gov. Jim Justice released a statement on Twitter:

                  “I ask all West Virginians to join me in praying for the coaches, players, and all those associated with the Martinsburg high school girls basketball team after they were involved in a vehicle accident tonight on I-64,” he wrote.

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                  Police received a call about the accident at 8:49 p.m. and emergency personnel were still on the scene at 10 p.m., Beckley’s WOAY-TV reported.

                  Beckley is about 124 miles northwest of Roanoke, Va.

                  This is a developing story. Check back for updates.