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Russia will exit INF nuclear missile treaty in six months

Moscow (CNN)Russia says it will mirror the United States' withdrawal from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty between the countries, formally exiting the agreement in six months.

Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov announced the move in a report from state news agency RIA-Novosti on Wednesday.
It comes after the Trump administration last week said it would be pulling out of the nuclear missile treaty, accusing Russia of violating its terms since 2014. Moscow rejects the accusations.
The US-Russia treaty, which was signed in December 1987 by US President Ronald Reagan and his Soviet counterpart Mikhail Gorbachev, bans ground-launched missiles with a range of between 500 and 5,500 kilometers, and has been a centerpiece of European security since the Cold War.
    In the RIA-Novosti report, Lavrov called the US accusations "unfounded," adding that Russian President Vladimir Putin's position was to "respond in a mirrored fashion" to the US.
    "The Americans suspended their participation in this treaty -- we did the same," Lavrov said.
    "After a six-month period, according to the results of the official note of the United States on withdrawal from this treaty, it will cease to function," he added.
    US President Trump and his senior officials had been signaling for months that they were ready to pull out of the agreement. Last week the US declared it would do so, unless Moscow complied with its terms within 180 days.
    The withdrawal has raised concerns about a renewed arms race with Moscow and put European allies on edge.
    "We are heading into a direction we have not been in in 40 years: no arms control limits or rules that we are both following, and that is very dangerous," said Lynn Rusten, a senior director for arms control and nonproliferation at the National Security Council during the Obama administration and now a vice president at the Washington DC-based Nuclear Threat Initiative.

    Russia carries out intercontinental ballistic missile test

    On the same day that Lavrov confirmed that Russia would be pulling out of the treaty in six months, the country's military announced it had carried out a successful test of a Yars intercontinental ballistic missile -- a system designed to carry thermonuclear warheads.
    In a statement on its Facebook page on Wednesday, the Russian Military of Defense said the missile was fired from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome, in northern Russia, towards the country's far east.
      The long-range missile was launched to test its "tactical, technical and flight characteristics," the military said.
      The US military also tests unarmed intercontinental ballistic missiles several times a year, launching them from the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, and over the Pacific Ocean to the Marshall Islands.

      Earth’s magnetic north pole is hurtling toward Russia

      The north magnetic pole has been heading for Siberia at a rate of around 34 miles per year.

      The north magnetic pole has been heading for Siberia at a rate of around 34 miles per year.

      (CNN)The north magnetic pole has been drifting so fast that it could be a problem for smartphone maps and navigation systems.

      The pole has been the friend of navigators for millennia, beckoning compass needles from virtually every point on the planet. And unlike the geographic north pole, which is fixed, the north magnetic pole has been slowly migrating over time — moving across the Canadian Arctic toward Russia since 1831.
      But its swift pace toward Siberia in recent years at a rate of around 34 miles per year has forced scientists to update the World Magnetic Model — used by civilian navigation systems, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and US and British militaries — a year ahead of schedule.
      “Due to unplanned variations in the Arctic region, scientists have released a new model to more accurately represent the change of the magnetic field between 2015 and now,” the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Centers for Environmental Information wrote in a press release Monday.
        The model, which is commissioned by the British and US military agencies, is typically updated every five years, the most recent being in 2015. But the agency explained that the “out-of-cycle update … will ensure safe navigation for military applications, commercial airlines, search and rescue operations, and others operating around the North Pole.”
        And while the model’s primary user is the military, it has found its way into Google and Apple’s civilian mapping systems. The difference will be minor for civilian purposes, however, and the changes are largely limited to latitudes above 55 degrees. “For most users below 55 degrees north, there is no real difference,” Ciaran Beggan, a geophysicist at the British Geological Survey, which creates the map with the NOAA, told CNN.
        Scientists first noticed the change in 2018 thanks to a “huge amount of satellite data,” which showed the pole had gone beyond the model’s predicted area, Beggan said.
        The drift is caused by processes deep inside the planet, he said. Earth’s magnetic field is created in its liquid outer core, which is made of liquid iron and nickel. “As it flows it creates an electronic current and that current makes a magnetic field — which drifts with the hot runny core,” he said.
          There have been a few theories about why the pole’s movement has increased in recent years — from around 6 miles a year between 1900 and 1980 before accelerating to around 24 to 31 miles a year in the past two decades. Some scientists think a jet stream of molten liquid is pushing the north pole, while others have suggested that the south and north magnetic poles are reversing positions.
          There is nothing to worry about, Beggan said. “It is unusual behavior in historical terms, (by) geological scales it is not unusual,” he said. “The magnetic field (changes) continuously, but it is partly because of its natural behavior,” he added.

          Russia must develop new missile systems in response to US withdrawal from treaty, minister says

          Moscow’s top minister said Russia must build a new land-based cruise missile and a new land-based hypersonic missile by 2021 in response to the U.S. withdrawal from a major arms-control treaty with the country.

          The minister’s call to arms came just days after Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced that the U.S. is pulling out of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces treaty, or INF, citing alleged violations by Russia.

          US PULLING OUT OF COLD WAR-ERA ARMS CONTROL TREATY WITH RUSSIA, POMPEO SAYS

          Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu was cited by RIA news agency on Tuesday as ordering the military to begin developing the new missile systems and make sure the technology works by 2021, Reuters reported.

          RUSSIA BOWS OUT OF NUCLEAR ARMS PACT IN RESPONSE TO US WITHDRAWAL

          “We will respond quid pro quo,” Russian President Vladimir Putin said as he announced the suspension of the INF treaty. “Our American partners have announced they were suspending their participation in the treaty, and we will do the same. They have announced they will conduct research and development, and we will act accordingly.”

          Pompeo accused Russia of developing and deploying a cruise missile that violates provisions of the pact that bans production, testing and deployment of land-based cruise and ballistic missiles with a range of 310 to 3,410 miles.

          Unlike the Kremlin, the U.S. “has fully adhered” to the pact for more than 30 years, Pompeo said, “but we will not remain constrained by its terms while Russia misrepresents its actions. We cannot be the only country in the world unilaterally bound by this treaty, or any other.”

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          He gave six months Russia to become compliant and destroy the cruise missiles that Washington claims are in violation.

          The Associated Press contributed to this report.

          Russia reopens investigation into 60-year-old Dyatlov Pass mystery

          Some members of the Dyatlov group during the expedition.

          Some members of the Dyatlov group during the expedition.

          (CNN)Russian prosecutors have launched a new investigation into the mysterious case of nine students who died in bizarre circumstances after disappearing on a skiing trip 60 years ago.

          Countless articles, books and documentaries have sought to explain the fate of the group from the Ural Polytechnic Institute who set off on the trip in 1959 under the direction of Igor Dyatlov, a fifth-year student.
          Igor Dyatlov

          Igor Dyatlov

          The Dyatlov Pass Incident, as it came to be known, has been compared with other unsolved mysteries, including the disappearance of Lord Lucan, the British aristocrat who vanished after his children’s nanny was found murdered, and the abandoned ship, the Marie Celeste. It has inspired many theories over the decades — but now the authorities are aiming to get to the bottom of it once and for all.
          Nobody has so far managed to uncover solid proof of why the group of experienced hikers fled their tents in a remote camping spot while partially clothed and without footwear. Their bodies were discovered over the following weeks in the snow, with several having suffered serious head wounds.
            The seven men and two women set off on the ski trip on January 23, 1959. Their 16-day itinerary aimed to cover 190 miles and cross the North Ural mountains: Otorten and Kholat Syakhl. The plan had been to make contact by telegram from the final point — a village called Vizhay — but this never happened.
            A search operation was launched on February 20, and six days later the students’ tent, which had been sliced open, was discovered. The following day the bodies of Yuri Doroshenko and Yuri Krivonischenko were found just over a mile away. Lying by a campfire, they were both stripped to their underwear.
            Rescuers found the group's tent abandoned and cut open

            Rescuers found the group's tent abandoned and cut open

            In the days that followed, three more of the skiers were dug up, including Dyatlov, while the remaining four were only found in May once the snow had melted.
            A criminal case was opened at the end of February, but it was closed three months later having concluded that the “spontaneous power of nature” was to blame. The Soviet-era investigation remained classified until the 1970s, the AFP news agency reported.
            For many, this explanation was far from satisfactory as it failed to explain why the adventurers had rushed out into the freezing cold wearing only underwear and without shoes. Nor did it address why several of the group had suffered broken bones and skulls.
            Some 75 theories have been put forward, according to the prosecutor’s office — including an alien abduction. Another suggests they were killed by members of the Mansi people, for whom the mountains were spiritually symbolic. Still others claimed the scene was staged in order to cover up details of a secret weapons testing program.
            However the new inquiries will only investigate three theories considered the “most likely ones.”
            “All of them are somehow connected with natural phenomena,” said Alexander Kurennoi, the official representative of Russia’s Prosecutor General.
            “Crime is out of the question,” he said, adding: “There is not a single proof, even an indirect one, to favor this (criminal) version. It was either an avalanche, a snow slab or a hurricane.”
            “Relatives, the media and the public still ask prosecutors to determine the truth and don’t hide their suspicions that something was hidden from them,” Kurennoi said in a video posted on an official website.
            Appearing at a press conference, a spokesman for the prosecutor’s office for the Sverdlovsk region revealed a 400-page volume of original case materials.
            Investigation files seen during the press conference

            Investigation files seen during the press conference

            Andrey Kuryakov told the news conference that investigators were relying on the help of “friends and family of the deceased” as well as modern technology, which was not available at the time.
            Andrei Kuryakov and journalists during a press conference on the reopening of the investigation into the  Dyatlov Pass Incident.

            Andrei Kuryakov and journalists during a press conference on the reopening of the investigation into the  Dyatlov Pass Incident.

            Also at the press conference was Petr Bartolomey, a friend of Dyatlov. He said: “A year prior (to the incident), we went to the Subpolar Urals in an expedition, where the conditions were much more difficult than his last venture. I have always characterized him as a wonderfully knowledgeable person, an athlete, always well-prepared … One could always rely on him.
              “I can say the same for the rest of the guys, although we did not go on as many expedition(s) as with Igor. I am glad that, years after, a high-level investigation is resumed to understand what exactly happened.”
              Next month prosecutors will fly to the site, and a range of experts and rescue workers will be involved in the investigation. Experts will conduct nine different examinations, including a forensic probe, which will help to fill in “a number of blank spots,” Kurennoi added.

              Russia bows out of nuclear arms pact in response to US withdrawal

              Russia on Saturday joined the U.S. in pulling out of a critical 32-year-old nuclear arms control treaty.

              The U.S. announced its withdrawal from the 1987 pact Friday, accusing Moscow of violating the ban on the use of short and medium missiles.

              “Our American partners announced that they are suspending their participation in the treaty, and we are suspending it too,” Russian President Vladimir Putin said Saturday, according to the BBC.

              US PULLING OUT OF COLD WAR-ERA ARMS CONTROL TREATY WITH RUSSIA, POMPEO SAYS

              “All of our proposals in this sphere, as before, remain on the table, the doors for talks are open,” he added.

              Earlier Saturday, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg told the BBC that all European allies agree with the U.S. because Russia has violated the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty for a long time.

              “They are deploying more and more of the new nuclear-capable missiles in Europe,” he said.

              RUSSIA DEPLOYS NUCLEAR-CAPABLE BALLISTIC MISSILE LAUNCHERS NEAR UKRAINE BORDER, SATELLITE PHOTOS SHOW

              The U.S. has accused Russia of developing and deploying a cruise missile that violates provisions of the pact that ban production, testing and deployment of land-based cruise and ballistic missiles with a range of 310 to 3,410 miles.

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              U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the treaty would terminate in six months unless Russia accepts U.S. demands that it verifiably destroy the cruise missiles that Washington claims are in violation.

              The Associated Press contributed to this report.

              Russia joins US in suspending INF nuclear missile treaty

              US suspends cold war-era nuclear arms treaty with Russia

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              (CNN)Russian President Vladimir Putin announced Moscow’s suspension of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces treaty on Saturday, according to the Kremlin’s official website.

              Putin held a special meeting with Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu following the US announcement on Friday that it would suspend compliance with the INF treaty, a key pact with Russia that has been a centerpiece of European security since the Cold War.
              “We will proceed as follows. We will have a tit-for-tat response. American partners have announced that they are suspending their participation in the treaty, so we are suspending ours as well,” said Putin, according to the website.
              “They announced that they are engaged in research & technological development work, and we will do the same.”
                Russia showed off its military might during a Victory Day parade in May 2017.

                Russia showed off its military might during a Victory Day parade in May 2017.

                While Putin emphasized that he did not want to start a new arms race, the Russian President also announced his support for a proposal to start construction of a new medium-range supersonic nuclear missile.
                The Kremlin website also said Putin agrees with the proposals of the Ministry of Defense to start “grounding” the “Kalibr” missiles and the opening of a new direction — the creation of a medium-range hypersonic ground-based rocket.”
                The INF treaty “bans ground-launched missiles with a range between 500 and 5,500 kilometers.”
                Russian Kalibr missiles are a type of cruise missile that Russian forces launch from ships and submarines. Now Putin is agreeing to allow the development of a land-launched variant.
                This new ground launched design would be a direct violation if the treaty was still being observed, but both Washington and Moscow have now suspended compliance.
                US officials claim that Russia has not been obeying the treaty, however Moscow has consistently rejected the accusations.
                In some quarters it is thought that the treaty has allowed China to gain a military advantage, as Beijing is not bound by the INF treaty’s limits on intermediate range missiles.
                On Saturday, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang released a statement outlining its opposition to the US decision to suspend compliance, saying that it “may trigger a series of adverse consequences.”
                Geng said the treaty “plays a significant role in easing major-country relations, promoting international and regional peace, and safeguarding global strategic balance and stability” and that China urges “US and Russia to properly resolve differences through constructive dialogue.”
                  The statement from Geng was released Saturday before Russia announced it was also suspending its compliance with the treaty.
                  When asked if China would agree to a new multilateral treaty on arms control to replace the INF, Geng responded: “The multilateralization of the INF Treaty involves a series of complex issues covering political, military and legal fields, which draws concerns from many countries. China opposes the multilateralization of this treaty. What is imperative at the moment is to uphold and implement the existing treaty instead of creating a new one.”

                  US pulling out of Cold War-era arms control treaty with Russia, Pompeo says

                  Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has announced that the U.S. is pulling out of a treaty with Russia that’s been a centerpiece of arms control since the Cold War.

                  The American withdrawal had been expected for months. It follows years of unresolved dispute over Russian compliance with the 1987 pact, which bans certain ground-launched cruise missiles. Russia denies violating the treaty.

                  This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

                  ABC: Emails and photos appear to contradict NRA claims distancing group from 2015 Russia trip

                  Lead Sara Murray Mueller NRA interest live Jake Tapper_00012412

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                  Washington (CNN)Emails and photos showing that members of the National Rifle Association organized a trip to Moscow in 2015 appear to contradict claims made by the group to distance itself from the trip, ABC reported Wednesday.

                  The New York Times reported earlier this week that members of the organization — including “high-profile donors, boosters and board members” — visited the country on a trip that was arranged by Maria Butina, an alleged Russian spy who pleaded guilty last month to attempting to infiltrate GOP political circles and influence US relations with Russia before and after the 2016 presidential election.
                  The paper said that in addition to Butina, the trip was organized with the help of David Keene, a former NRA president with ties to the alleged spy. According to the Times, the NRA is attempting to distance itself from the trip after it became clear that Butina was involved with it. A person who answered the phone when CNN attempted to contact Keene directed questions to the NRA.
                  In a statement to CNN, a lawyer for the NRA said CEO and Executive Vice President Wayne LaPierre encouraged people not to go on the trip when he became aware of its details. LaPierre prohibited staff members from attending the trip at the time and then-NRA President Allan Cors agreed not to go on the trip.
                    “When he became aware of the details of the trip, Wayne was personally opposed to it,” said William A. Brewer III, partner at Brewer, Attorneys & Counselors and counsel for the NRA. “In order that the group was not viewed as representing the NRA, Wayne spoke with several people about the excursion. As a result, Mr. Cors agreed not to make the trip. In addition, NRA staff members who were in Israel (for a trip that preceded the visit to Russia) returned home.”
                    However, ABC reported on Wednesday that emails sent by NRA officials and photos taken during the trip and reviewed by the outlet “appear to show the organization was significantly involved in planning it.”
                    According to ABC, one email, shared with the outlet by an unnamed source, shows an NRA employee appearing “to help Butina make travel arrangements for a delegation” that included a litany of NRA officials, including Keene and future NRA president Pete Brownell.
                    Other emails suggest that the organization would cover trip expenses for two members of the trip and would provide official NRA “gifts” for the visitors to give to their hosts, according to the outlet.
                    A photo ABC said was posted to Facebook by “one of Butina’s fellow gun-rights enthusiasts” reportedly shows the alleged Russian spy standing alongside members of the group and a red sign emblazoned with the NRA’s logo and the words “Welcome to Russia comrads (sic).”
                      ABC also said that another Butina associate characterized the trip as “official” in a Facebook post about it.
                      “The delegation of the world’s largest social organization for supporters of weapons, the National Rifle Association USA (The NRA) made an official visit to Moscow and met with supporters of the movement, Right to Arms,” the post, translated from Russian, read, according to ABC.

                      Facebook and Twitter remove thousands of fake accounts tied to Russia, Venezuela and Iran

                      Washington (CNN Business)For anyone hoping that foreign operations are no longer using social media to try to meddle in and influence debate and policy in the US and all over the world, Thursday should be a wakeup call.

                      Thursday afternoon, Facebook announced the suspension of a network of accounts it said was engaged in "coordinated inauthentic behavior on Facebook and Instagram" that was "directed from Iran."
                      Almost simultaneously, Twitter announced that it had suspended what it termed networks of accounts that it termed "foreign information operations" potentially connected to Iran, Venezuela and Russia.
                      Twitter said it was confident that the accounts it identified as linked to Russia had originated there, but could not say for sure whether they were run by the Internet Research Agency, the notorious Kremlin-linked troll group indicted by Special Counsel Robert Mueller last year.
                        The hundreds of Russia-linked accounts it suspended had together sent almost a million tweets, many relating to US politics, Twitter said. The accounts appear at the moment to have been significantly less influential than those allegedly run by the Internet Research Agency during the 2016 presidential campaign. But they had tried to weigh in on the 2018 midterm elections; the accounts tweeted more than 73,000 times about those elections, Twitter said.
                        Russian-linked trolls attempting to influence the US through social media have often played to both left and right, and that appears to be the case with this batch of accounts as well. However, there does appear to have been a concerted attempt using the accounts to push some right-wing hashtags. Twitter said that the accounts had sent almost 40,000 tweets with the hashtag #ReleaseTheMemo, another 40,000 tweets with the hashtag #MAGA, and 18,000 tweets using the hashtag #IslamIsTheProblem. It is not clear whether the accounts' tweets had any significant impact on the hashtags' popularity.
                        The #ReleaseTheMemo hashtag emerged in January 2018 when Republican Rep. Devin Nunes, the then chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, touted a document that alleged FBI surveillance abuses during the 2016 election.
                        Twitter also announced it removed a network of accounts run from Venezuela which "appear to be engaged in a state-backed influence campaign" targeting Venezuelan audiences on behalf of the country's president.
                          The company said it had also removed a network of accounts from Iran that were pretending to be US people or news outlets.
                          Facebook said it had taken down 783 pages, groups, and accounts that were run from Iran. The pages primarily aimed at the Middle East and South Asia, but also targeted the US, Facebook said in a blog post.

                          5 things to know for January 31: Cold, Russia probe, Foxconn, immigration, Fed rates

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                          (CNN)Step inside the cave in Siberia that sheltered the first known humans 300,000 years ago. Here’s what else you need to know to Get Up to Speed and Out the Door. (You can also get “5 Things You Need to Know Today” delivered to your inbox daily. Sign up here.)

                          1. Cold wave

                          The Midwest is still stuck in a deep freeze. The temperature is well below zero in many states, thanks to a breakdown in the polar vortex that’s flooding the region with the coldest air it’s seen in years. Chicago set an all-time record low of 27 below zero. And residents are reporting hearing a series of mysterious booms. Those are “frost quakes,” which happen when water underground freezes and expands, causing soil and rock to crack. In the Northeast, snow squalls and near-whiteout conditions hampered motorists.
                            At least 10 deaths are linked to the extreme weather this week. More than 4,800 flights have been canceled. Schools are closed. Mail delivery is suspended. Blood drives are called off. Chicago’s commuter train service is setting tracks on fire, for safety. Even beer deliveries are on hold. Those are just some of the 17 ways (and counting) the cold temps are hitting the country.

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                            2. Russia investigation

                            A pro-Russian Twitter account spread confidential information from a criminal case that special counsel Robert Mueller’s team brought against a Russian company for social media conspiracy, the Justice Department said. Prosecutors allege that info shared with lawyers representing Concord Management and Consulting ended up being used by the now-suspended Twitter account in an effort to discredit Mueller’s Russia investigation. The development highlights just how tense the standoff has gotten between US law enforcement and the Russian operation accused of interfering in the 2016 election.

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                            3. Foxconn

                            Foxconn got $ 4 billion in tax breaks (and a ton of controversy) in exchange for a promise to build flat-screen panels at a Wisconsin plant and hire up to 13,000 workers. Now, it looks like the Taiwanese electronics manufacturer is changing its plans. Foxconn says it can’t “compete” with lower-cost flat-panel plants elsewhere in the world, so it’s going to create a technology hub in Wisconsin instead of a factory. Three-fourths of the jobs will be in research, development and design, rather than the blue-collar manufacturing jobs President Trump crowed about when the deal was announced. Foxconn said it’s still committed to creating as many as 13,000 jobs in Wisconsin.

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                            4. Immigration

                            An immigrant family set to be deported from the Netherlands can stay in the country for at least a little longer, thanks to a church service that lasted more than three months. The Tamrazyans, a family of five from Armenia, had sought asylum but got denied. They sought shelter in October in a church in The Hague. Since Dutch law prohibits police from entering a church during a service, the church held rites continuously for 96 days to protect the family. Now, the Dutch government has struck a deal that allows the asylum applications of families already in the country to be reassessed.

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                            5. Federal Reserve

                            Wall Street heard the news it wanted from the Fed: No interest rate hikes for now. The Dow celebrated by climbing 435 points. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell said the decision was not based on worries about the US economy, which is still quite strong. Regulators are concerned about the economic slowdown in China and Europe, the US trade war with the Chinese and the just-ended partial government shutdown. President Trump, in a break with White House precedent, had been lobbying for the Fed to slow down the rate hikes, but Powell said that had nothing to do the decision.

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                            BREAKFAST BROWSE

                            Spelling is everything
                            Ariana Grande fixed her tattoo. Meant to celebrate her single, “7 Rings,” it had praised barbecue (in Japanese character symbols) instead.
                            Doggonit
                            It’s about to get really hard to be a dog owner in Iran. The country has reportedly banned pooches from riding in cars and from being walked in public.
                            Well, of course, it’s Florida
                            Public works employees responding to a report of a sinkhole found something entirely different: a small tunnel leading to a bank.
                            Listening in
                            Meet the 14-year-old who discovered the bug in Apple’s FaceTime that turned iPhones into eavesdropping devices.

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                            Stepping in
                            Nick Cannon, who’s already hosting, like, a billion other shows on TV, will guest-host Wendy Williams’ show as she deals with Graves’ disease.

                            TODAY’S NUMBER

                            $ 6.9 billion
                            Facebook’s record profit for the last quarter of 2018. Turns out the PR crises don’t seem to be hurting it too much.

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                            TODAY’S QUOTES

                            “Leave me alone.”
                            Singer Céline Dion, to critics who say she’s lost too much weight

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                            “I ate Jeni’s ice cream and watched Netflix for three straight days.”
                            New Orleans Saints head coach Sean Payton, who dealt with his team’s heartbreaking loss in the NFC Championship just like any fan would. And the Who Dat Nation isn’t done mourning. Many Saints fans vow not to watch Sunday’s Super Bowl (though it won’t dent national ratings).

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                            AND FINALLY

                              Along for the ride
                              What’s it like to go downhill skiing? You’re about to find out, thanks to this guy, who swapped out one of his ski poles for a selfie stick. (Click to view.)