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Trump to Pelosi on shutdown, border wall: ‘Let’s make a deal’

As the fight over the federal government shutdown entered the new year, President Trump on Tuesday expressed his desire to “make a deal” with House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi over funding for his border wall.

“Border Security and the Wall ‘thing’ and Shutdown is not where Nancy Pelosi wanted to start her tenure as Speaker!” Trump tweeted. “Let’s make a deal?”

Pelosi is poised to become speaker of the House when Democrats officially take back control of the chamber on Thursday. Trump’s comments come amid the news that House Democrats plan to introduce a legislative package to re-open the government on Thursday – though it is unclear whether Trump or Republicans in the Senate will go along with it.

Fox News has learned there is a briefing at the White House on Wednesday for the top two leaders of each party from each chamber for the new Congress to discuss the impasse.

The House Democratic plan will include one bill to fund the Department of Homeland Security at current levels through Feb. 8, with $ 1.3 billion for border security. It doesn’t include money for the president’s desired wall on the border.

Whether the Republican-led Senate, under Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, will consider the bills — or if Trump would sign either into law — was unclear. McConnell spokesman Donald Stewart said Senate Republicans won’t not take action without Trump’s backing.

“It’s simple: The Senate is not going to send something to the president that he won’t sign,” Stewart said.

Even if only symbolic, the passage of the bills in the House would put fresh pressure on the president.

Republicans and Democrats have been at a standstill over President Trump’s demands for $ 5 billion to fund the border wall. Earlier Tuesday, the president ripped into Democrats for insisting they won’t fund a border wall.

“One thing has now been proven,” Trump tweeted. “The Democrats do not care about Open Borders and all of the crime and drugs that Open Borders bring!”

Negotiations over the partial government shutdown stalled over the holidays.

“Our negotiations are at an impasse at the moment,” Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., the chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, said on CBS’ “Face the Nation” on Sunday. “I wish it were not so.”

Funding for a slew of federal agencies lapsed at midnight on Dec. 22 – just days before Christmas — after Congress and the White House failed to pass a spending package. Nine of 15 Cabinet-level departments and dozens of agencies have closed, affecting about a quarter of the federal government.

With no resolution in sight, the shutdown is forcing hundreds of thousands of federal workers and contractors to stay home or work without pay. Museums and galleries popular with visitors and locals in the nation’s capital will close starting midweek if the partial shutdown of the federal government drags on.

Fox News’ Chad Pergram and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Bayer is cutting 12,000 jobs in the wake of its Monsanto deal

Bayer is cutting thousands of jobs.

London (CNN Business)Bayer plans to slash thousands of jobs as part of a corporate overhaul following its acquisition of Monsanto.

The chemicals and pharmaceuticals group said it would cut 12,000 jobs out of its global workforce of 118,000 by the end of 2021. A significant number of the reductions will be made in its home market of Germany.
More than 4,000 jobs will go at the company’s crop sciences division, a consequence of Bayer’s acquisition of US rival Monsanto earlier this year.
    Bayer (BAYRY) spent over $ 60 billion buying Monsanto. To gain regulatory approval for the deal, Bayer agreed to sell assets including its seed business and some herbicide brands.
    The German company said in a statement on Thursday that it was considering whether to sell more assets, including the sunscreen business Coppertone and footwear brand Dr. Scholl’s.
    It will get out of the business of animal health, and sell its 60% stake in Currenta, a company that provides services to chemical companies.
    Shares in Bayer have dropped by more than a third so far this year, in part because of concerns over the company’s exposure to lawsuits involving Roundup, a weedkiller made by Monsanto.
      In August, San Francisco jurors awarded $ 289 million in damages to a former school groundskeeper who said his terminal cancer had been caused by the product.
      The damages were later reduced by a judge, but hundreds of other patients have made similar claims. Monsanto has said the product is safe when used as directed.

      The UK government says its Brexit deal will hurt the economy

      London (CNN Business)It's official: The British government's plan for leaving the European Union will be bad for the economy.

      The government and the Bank of England will publish reports on Wednesday that outline the economic costs associated with a range of Brexit scenarios.
      The UK economy will be worse off under all of them, UK Treasury chief Philip Hammond told Sky News.
        "Yes, there will be a cost to leaving the European Union, because it makes our trade less fluid and it cuts us [off] from an important export market," Hammond said. "The important thing ... is to keep trade flowing as much as we can."
        There are just four months remaining before Britain leaves the European Union, and it's still not clear whether Prime Minister Theresa May can deliver an orderly departure from the bloc.
        The legally-binding divorce deal she has negotiated would give business much-needed certainty about the next two years. But she still needs to secure approval from a skeptical parliament, and a much looser agreement on the trading relationship after the transition period provides very few details.
        If May's plan fails, potential alternatives include crashing out of the European Union without a deal, a second referendum or a general election in Britain.
        Hammond told the BBC that while May's plan minimizes the damage, it will still leave the UK economy worse off than remaining in the European Union.
        "It is true that the economy will be very slightly smaller, but if we do the deal in the way that the prime minister has set out and negotiated, that impact will be entirely manageable," he said. "If you look purely at the economics, remaining in the single market would give us an economic advantage."
        May's plan includes a transition period during which most trading rules for companies will remain the same. It would also mean a close relationship with the European Union on trade in financial services, and broad cooperation on transportation and energy.
        Economists say the worse possible outcome would be a chaotic Brexit. Crashing out of the European Union would sink the UK economy into recession, analysts have warned.
          "A no-deal exit will have a much higher cost impact on the economy than the deal the prime minister has negotiated," Hammond said Wednesday.
          Analysis by a group campaigning for a second referendum showed the UK economy would be 4% smaller by 2030 under May's deal. The National Institute for Economic and Social Research said on Monday that new trade barriers would make it difficult to sell services from the United Kingdom and discourage investment.

          Mueller: Manafort has lied to FBI, special counsel’s office since plea deal

          Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort lied to the FBI and Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s office “on a variety of subject matters” since his plea deal earlier this year, thereby violating the agreement, Mueller said in a court filing submitted Monday night, while adding that Manafort claims he’s been truthful.

          “After signing the plea agreement, Manafort committed federal crimes by lying to the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Special Counsel’s Office on a variety of subject matters, which constitute breaches of the agreement,” Mueller’s office said in a joint status report released Monday.

          Manafort, however, according to the report, contested the claims of the special counsel.

          “Manafort met with the government on numerous occasions and answered the government’s questions,” the report said, citing the former chairman. “Manafort has provided information to the government in an effort to live up to his cooperation obligations. He believes he has provided truthful information and does not agree with the government’s characterization or that he has breached the agreement.”

          But Mueller’s office argued that they will “file a detailed sentencing submission to the Probation Department and the Court in advance of sentencing that sets forth the nature of the defendant’s crimes and lies, including those after signing the plea agreement herein.”

          Manafort, 69, was convicted on multiple counts of financial fraud over the summer in connection to work he completed in Ukraine as a political consultant. Approaching a separate trial on similar charges in September he entered into an arrangement with the government in which he was expected to answer questions on a wide variety of matters.

          This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

          Trump dims hopes of China trade deal with fresh tariff threat on Apple phones

          The real cost of Trump's tariffs

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            The real cost of Trump’s tariffs

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          The real cost of Trump’s tariffs 03:09

          Washington (CNN Business)President Donald Trump appears to be shutting the door on a temporary ceasefire in an ongoing tit-for-tat trade war with China just days ahead of an upcoming summit in Argentina.

          The President told the Wall Street Journal in an interview published Monday that it was “highly unlikely” he would accept an offer by Chinese leader Xi Jinping aimed at averting Trump’s plan to raise tariffs on more than $ 200 billion of Chinese goods to 25% in January.
          He also warned once again he was poised to slap a third round of tariffs on Chinese goods if the two leaders fail to broker an end to the trade rift when they meet later this week in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on the sidelines of the G20 summit.
            “If we don’t make a deal, then I’m going to put the $ 267 billion additional on,” said Trump in the interview, adding the tariff level could either be 10% or 25%.
            Trump said in the interview that could include tariffs on Apple products imported from China, including iPhones and laptops. Apple’s stock fell 1.5% in after-hours trading, erasing earlier gains from the day.
            “Maybe. Maybe. Depends on what the rate is,” the president said. “I mean, I can make it 10%, and people could stand that very easily.”
            The tariffs have drawn complaints from American businesses, who are responsible for paying the import duties. It’s also spurred concerns about renewed inflation, just as the Federal Reserve is set to raise interest rates in December.
            More than 100 S&P companies have already pre-emptively telegraphed during the third quarter earnings calls the damage further tariffs would impose on the US economy. Multiple companies including Walmart, the country’s biggest retailer, have warned that prices on everyday goods like shampoo, detergents and paper goods — such as napkins — will get more expensive for consumers.
            In the lead-up to this weekend’s leaders meeting, Trump surrogates have continuously warned Beijing negotiators that threats by the President should be taken seriously.
            Vice President Mike Pence said earlier this month that Trump wasn’t in any rush to end the trade war and was willing to “more than double” the tariffs it has already placed on $ 250 billion in Chinese goods. The United States “will not change course until China changes its ways,” Pence said in his speech at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Papua New Guinea.
            The upcoming meeting is the only imminent opportunity for a direct encounter between Trump and Xi before the January 1 deadline, and investors are eagerly looking for signs for a truce between the two sides.
            Speaking on the South Lawn with reporters, Trump hedged bets on any possible deal making with his Chinese counterpart. “It could happen. They have to treat us fairly,” he said.
              While so far much of the attention on the undo harm of the existing tariffs has fallen on China, political scientists and economists also warn there could be deeper ramifications for American corporations, if the Chinese opt to restrict American investment.
              “A lot of the problem for business is uncertainty,” said David Dollar, a senior fellow in the John L. Thornton China Center at the Brookings Institution and a former economic and financial emissary to China for the Treasury Department under President Barack Obama. “They can live with whatever policy regime there is whether we are taxing everything from China or not. They just hate the uncertainty.”

              Incoming Mexican government disputes report of tentative deal with U.S. on asylum-seekers

              Reports on Saturday said the Trump administration had struck a tentative deal with Mexico’s incoming government to require all asylum-seekers from south of the border to wait in Mexico while their asylum claims go through court.

              But by early evening, the picture grew more complex, as the incoming Mexican government said there was “no agreement of any sort.”

              The Washington Post, citing Mexican officials and senior members of president-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s transition team, reported early Saturday that the Remain in Mexico plan would require asylum applicants to stay in Mexico, therefore ending the “catch-and-release” practice whereby those seeking asylum are allowed to stay in the U.S. while their claims are being processed. This is one of several options the Trump administration has been pursuing in negotiations for months.

              Implementation of such a policy would mark a significant victory for President Trump, whose tough immigration stance — including his promises to end catch-and-release and build a wall — has formed a central part of his political platform both before and after his election.

              The Wall Street Journal, in its own report on the agreement, said it strives to control how many migrants are allowed to stay on the American side of the border during the asylum process.

              The White House did not comment on the reported deal on Saturday. “President Trump has developed a strong relationship with the incoming Obrador Administration, and we look forward to working with them on a wide range of issues,” Deputy Press Secretary Hogan Gidley told Fox News.

              But according to The Associated Press, the new Mexican leadership was telling a somewhat different story.

              “There is no agreement of any sort between the incoming Mexican government and the U.S. government,” future Interior Minister Olga Sanchez said in a statement. That ran contrary to The Post’s account of the agreement with the incoming administration of Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, who takes office Dec. 1.

              The Post had also quoted Sanchez as saying, “For now, we have agreed to this policy of Remain in Mexico.”

              Sanchez, in her statement to AP, did not explain why The Post had quoted her affirming the existence of an agreement.

              The statement shared with AP said the future government’s principal concern related to the migrants is their well-being while in Mexico.

              Trump has been battling with international pressure, a tight control of the Senate, and significant judicial pushback over a number of his immigration policies.

              JUDGE BARS US FROM ENFORCING TRUMP ADMINISTRATION’S ASYLUM BAN

              This week a federal judge in San Francisco barred the administration from refusing asylum to those who cross the southern border illegally, after the White House said that anyone crossing illegally would be declared ineligible for asylum.

              The deal appeared to be coming at a time when Trump has set his sights on the latest migrant caravan to travel through Honduras and Guatemala toward the U.S. southern border. He has expressed determination to stop the caravan from reaching the U.S., deploying troops to the border and warning of consequences should countries assist the caravan in its journey.

              It was not clear at press time what the policy consequences of this latest disagreement on an asylum-seeker deal might be.

              Fox News’ Marta Dhanis, Jeffrey Rubin and Elizabeth Zwirz, and The Associated Press, contributed to this report.

              Trump administration makes tentative deal to force asylum-seekers to wait in Mexico: reports

              The Trump administration has reportedly made a deal with Mexico’s incoming government to require all asylum-seekers coming from the south of the border to wait in Mexico while their asylum claims go through court.

              The Washington Post, citing Mexican officials and senior members of president-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s transition team, reported Saturday that the Remain in Mexico plan would require asylum applicants to stay in Mexico, therefore ending the “catch-and-release” practice whereby those seeking asylum are allowed to stay in the U.S.

              Should the policy be implemented, it would mark a significant victory for President Trump, whose tough immigration stance — including his promises to end catch-and-release and build a wall — has formed a central part of his political platform both before and after his election.

              The currently unsigned agreement strives to control how many migrants are allowed to stay on the American side of the border during the asylum process, according to The Wall Street Journal, which confirmed the Post report.

              The White House did not comment on the reported deal on Saturday.

              “President Trump has developed a strong relationship with the incoming Obrador Administration, and we look forward to working with them on a wide range of issues,” Deputy Press Secretary Hogan Gidley told Fox News.

              Trump has been battling with international pressure, a tight control of the Senate, and significant judicial pushback over a number of his immigration policies.

              JUDGE BARS US FROM ENFORCING TRUMP ADMINISTRATION’S ASYLUM BAN

              This week a federal judge in San Francisco barred the administration from refusing asylum to those who cross the southern border illegally, after the White House said that anyone crossing illegally would be declared ineligible for asylum.

              The deal also comes as Trump has set his sights in recent weeks on the latest migrant caravan to travel through Honduras and Guatemala toward the U.S. southern border. He has expressed determination to stop the caravan reaching the U.S., deploying troops to the border and warning of consequences should countries assist the caravan in its journey.

              The reported deal is likely to be seen by Trump’s supporters as proof that his hardline rhetoric has resulted in success. The Post reported that the deal took shape in Houston during a meeting including Marcelo Ebrard, Mexico’s incoming foreign minister, and top U.S. officials such as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen.

              However, incoming Mexican Interior Minister Olga Sanchez Cordero told The Post that the deal would be a “short-term solution.”

              “The medium- and long-term solution is that people don’t migrate,” Sánchez Cordero said. “Mexico has open arms and everything, but imagine, one caravan after another after another, that would also be a problem for us.”

              Fox News’ Marta Dhanis and Elizabeth Zwirz contributed to this report.

              Trump administration makes tentative deal to force asylum-seekers to wait in Mexico: report

              The Trump administration has reportedly made a deal with Mexico’s incoming government to require all asylum-seekers coming from the south of the border to wait in Mexico while their asylum claims goes through court.

              The Washington Post, citing Mexican officials and senior members of president-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s transition team, reported Saturday that the Remain in Mexico plan would require asylum applicants to stay in Mexico, therefore ending the “catch-and-release” practice whereby those seeking asylum are allowed to stay in the U.S.

              Should the policy be implemented, it would mark a significant victory for President Trump, whose tough immigration stance — including his promises to end catch-and-release and build a wall — has formed a central part of his political platform both before and after his election.

              But the White House did not comment on the reported deal on Saturday

              “President Trump has developed a strong relationship with the incoming Obrador Administration, and we look forward to working with them on a wide range of issues.” Deputy Press Secretary Hogan Gidley told Fox News.

              Trump has been battling with international pressure, a tight control of the Senate, and significant judicial pushback over a number of his immigration policies.

              JUDGE BARS US FROM ENFORCING TRUMP ADMINISTRATION’S ASYLUM BAN

              This week a federal judge in San Francisco barred the administration from refusing asylum to those who cross the southern border illegally, after the White House said that anyone crossing illegally would be declared ineligible for asylum.

              The deal also comes as Trump has set his sights in recent weeks on the latest migrant caravan to travel through Honduras and Guatemala toward the U.S. southern border. He has expressed determination to stop the caravan reaching the U.S., deploying troops to the border and warning of consequences should countries assist the caravan in its journey.

              The reported deal is likely to be seen by Trump’s supporters as proof that his hardline rhetoric has resulted in success. The Post reported that the deal took shape in Houston during a meeting including Marcelo Ebrard, Mexico’s incoming foreign minister, and top U.S. officials such as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen.

              However, incoming Mexican Interior Minister Olga Sanchez Cordero told The Post that the deal would be a “short-term solution.”

              “The medium- and long-term solution is that people don’t migrate,” Sánchez Cordero said. “Mexico has open arms and everything, but imagine, one caravan after another after another, that would also be a problem for us.”

              Fox News’ Marta Dhanis contributed to this report.

              Injured man to appeal jury’s $524G award after rejecting casino’s $2.5M settlement deal

              A California man who was injured outside a Las Vegas hotel in 2015 rolled the dice by rejecting the hotel’s $ 2.5 million settlement offer — and going to trial instead, in hopes of getting more.

              That decision appears to have cost him about $ 2 million. The jury awarded only about $ 524,000 to plaintiff Glenn Richardson, of Carlsbad, Calif.

              Richardson claims he suffered head and body injuries when a temporary sign — advertising an outdoor event — collapsed and hit him near the pool area of the Mandalay Bay resort.

              His attorney, Adam Breeden, said he intends to appeal the jury’s verdict Monday, with a filing to be delivered to the Clark County District Court.

              A spokesman for the hotel’s owner, MGM Resorts International, meanwhile, said the company respects the jury’s decision.

              The Associated Press contributed to this story.

              What the Brexit deal means for business, markets and the economy

              London (CNN Business)The United Kingdom has taken a step towards securing a Brexit deal with the European Union. For businesses, the agreement would deliver much-needed certainty about the next two years.

              Prime Minister Theresa May said Wednesday that her cabinet supported the deal, but she must still push it through a divided parliament. If she does, executives and investors will at long last have a road map.
              "This is a decisive step which enables us to move on and finalize the deal in the days ahead," May told reporters following a marathon cabinet meeting. "It is a decision that is firmly in the national interest."
                But the resignation of key UK government ministers on Thursday underscored the difficulty of gaining parliamentary approval for the deal. The pound dropped sharply against the US dollar following the resignations, weakening as much as 1.8%.
                Here's what the deal — should it survive — would mean for business, markets and the economy.

                Business

                Companies in Britain and the European Union have spent months preparing for a chaotic Brexit. Their biggest fear is a scenario where the United Kingdom crashes out of the European Union, leading to new trade barriers.
                That risk hasn't been completely eliminated and companies remain cautious. Still, business groups including the British Retail Consortium welcomed news of a potential deal.
                "It is vital that we avoid the cliff edge of no deal in March 2019 as this could immediately lead to consumers facing higher prices and reduced availability of many everyday products," said Helen Dickinson, the industry group's chief executive.
                Key manufacturing firms also cheered the emergence of a deal.
                "My gut feeling is we need to get behind it and we need to make this deal work. What we need is certainty," Juergen Maier, UK CEO of German engineering giant Siemens (SIEGY), told BBC Radio.
                The deal includes a transition period during which most trading rules for companies in Britain will remain the same. A joint declaration published Wednesday said that agreement had been reached on a close relationship on trade in financial services, and broad cooperation on transportation and energy.
                But businesses have also been warned to prepare for a scenario where the deal falls through.
                "We still urge business to continue preparing for both a deal and no deal scenario until the deal is ratified," said Andrew Gray, head of Brexit at PwC.
                One more problem: The deal only covers the divorce terms, and doesn't give businesses much clarity about a future trading relationship between the United Kingdom and its biggest trading partner following the transition.
                The joint declaration said that negotiations had been "particularly challenging" on how future trade in goods would be conducted.

                Markets

                The pound has been volatile since Brits voted to leave the European Union in June 2016, and it's still trading almost 14% lower than on the day of the referendum.
                Analysts said it would strengthen following a deal.
                "If the deal as described in the press were to pass into law, both [the pound] and [the euro] would benefit," Kit Juckes, a strategist at Societe Generale, wrote in a note to clients.
                Kallum Pickering, a senior economist at Berenberg bank, said the pound would likely jump higher in two stages, along with government bond yields and shares in companies that do business in Britain.
                He expects the first increase once the UK parliament has approved the divorce deal, which could happen in December, and the second during the following year as investors update their outlook for the United Kingdom.
                Karen Ward, a market strategist at JPMorgan Asset Management, said that investors were still "most nervous" about the deal getting through parliament. But she expects it to be approved.
                "Going into next year we expect business investment to experience a relief rally and higher sterling to depress inflation and lift real wages so consumer spending would also accelerate," she wrote in a research note.
                If the deal fails and Britain crashes out of the bloc, S&P estimates the pound will slump 15% against the dollar.

                Economy

                Economists say a Brexit deal would boost the beleaguered UK economy.
                "While the long-term risks to UK potential growth from Brexit loom large, the prospect of a deal presents considerable upside potential for the UK economy over the medium-term," Pickering said.
                Berenberg estimates that a deal would lift economic growth to 2% in 2019, from 1.3% this year.
                  The UK economy slowed sharply following the Brexit vote, but it has avoided slumping into recession. Investment also slumped dramatically.
                  A chaotic Brexit, without a deal, could sink the economy into a prolonged recession, S&P warned last month.