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Flake blocked in bid to force vote on save-Mueller bill, as Trump court pick caught in crossfire

Outgoing Arizona GOP Sen. Jeff Flake joined with several Democrats on Wednesday in a failed attempt to force a vote on legislation to protect Special Counsel Robert Mueller from inappropriate removal or political pressure.

Flake, along with Delaware Democratic Sen. Chris Coons and New Jersey Democratic Sen. Cory Booker, tried to use a parliamentary maneuver to pave the way for a vote on the Special Counsel Independence and Integrity Act.

Flake asked for unanimous consent to vote on the bill, but Utah Sen. Mike Lee objected, blocking the effort.

The three lawmakers expressed concern over comments made by President Trump, who has called the Mueller probe a “phony witch hunt,” as well as Trump’s ousting of Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

“It’s clear, therefore, something has to be done to protect Mr. Mueller’s investigation,” Flake said on the Senate floor.

The Special Counsel Independence and Integrity Act mandates that a special counsel can only be fired for good cause by a senior Justice Department official.

Some Republicans counter that the bill is unnecessary. During Tuesday’s briefing, White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders denied that the president is considering firing Mueller.

“Look, I think that the president has had Robert Mueller doing his job for the last two years, and he could’ve taken action at any point, and he hasn’t. So we’ll let that speak for itself,” she said.

Sanders added, “He has no intent to do anything.”

The blocking of the bill, though, could complicate GOP efforts to confirm Trump’s judicial nominees.

Flake, who is retiring from the Senate, has said he won’t support any of Trump’s judicial nominees until he gets a vote on his bill to protect Special Counsel Robert Mueller from firing. Later Wednesday, Republicans hope to move forward with plans to vote on Thomas Farr’s nomination to serve on the federal bench for the Eastern District of North Carolina.

Should Flake vote against Farr on Wednesday afternoon, that would take the GOP down to a maximum of 50 yeas. Vice President Pence could be needed to break a tie on the procedural vote, and potentially to confirm Farr later this week.

The Farr nomination has been controversial, with all 49 Democrats oppose Farr, arguing that Farr discriminated against African Americans through his rulings on voting laws.

“Mr. Farr defended North Carolina’s absurdly restrictive voter ID law, also passed by the conservative Republican state legislature, and they tailored their election laws to disadvantage African-American voters after requesting race-specific data on voting practices,” Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer of New York said.

Republicans, meanwhile, are standing behind Farr.

“The American Bar Association’s Standing Committee on the Federal Judiciary — a body that’s frequently been held up by my Democratic colleagues as the ‘gold standard’ — has awarded Mr. Farr its highest possible rating: unanimously well qualified,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said.

Fox News’ Chad Pergram contributed to this report.

Monica Lewinsky reveals Bill Clinton urged her to lie under oath: ‘I did feel uncomfortable about it’

Monica Lewinsky has opened up for the first time about how Bill Clinton convinced her “to break the law” and lie under oath.

In the final part of the A&E docuseries “The Clinton Affair,” Lewinsky revealed that Clinton convinced her to deny the affair if she was called to testify in the Paula Jones case. The 45-year-old recalled the former president telling her that she could avoid being deposed if she denied the affair in an affidavit.

Lewinsky said that Clinton had called her at 2:30 in the morning to let her know that she was on the witness list for the Paula Jones case.

MONICA LEWINSKY SAYS SHE WAS ‘GUTTED’ AFTER BILL CLINTON LABELED HER ‘THAT WOMAN’ IN DOC: ‘I FELT ANGER’

“I was petrified. I was frantic about my family and this becoming public,” Lewinsky tearfully recalled. “Thankfully, Bill helped me lock myself back from that and he said I could probably sign an affidavit to get out of it, and he didn’t even know if a 100 percent I would be subpoenaed.”

She was subpoenaed a few days later.

And though she clarified that Clinton never said the words “you’re going to have to lie here,” Lewinsky pointed out that he also never said “we’re going to have to tell the truth.”

(Courtesy of A&E)

After being subpoenaed, the former White House staffer decided to talk to attorney Vernon Jordan, a close friend of Clinton. In the documentary, Lewinsky claims that she managed to secure a meeting with Jordan on her own and from that meeting, she was introduced to lawyer Frank Carter.

“Frank Carter explained to me if I’d signed an affidavit denying having had an intimate relationship with the president it might mean I wouldn’t have to be deposed in the Paula Jones case,” she recounted. “I did feel uncomfortable about it but I felt it was the right thing to do, ironically, right? So, the right thing to do, to break the law.”

Following her decision to sign the affidavit, Clinton called Lewinsky to the White House for a somewhat private Christmas celebration.

‘LOST TAPES’ FROM BILL CLINTON, MONICA LEWINSKY YEARS REEMERGE IN NEW DOCUMENTARY

“This is the first time I met Buddy, the dog, and we kind of all played around with Buddy in the office and then we went into the back study and we had a Christmas kiss,” the Vanity Fair writer revealed.

She continued: “Over the summer he had gone to Martha’s Vineyard and he brought back a bunch of different things. He had this big canvas bag from the Black Dog. This marble bear, sunglasses. It was the most presents he’d given me at one time. He knew the subpoena was gonna ask to produce certain items and yet he was giving me more gifts. He clearly still trusted me.”

Lewinsky added that at the time, she gave the president’s gifts to his secretary for safekeeping and to avoid possible seizure.

Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky.

Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky. (Getty)

While things seemed to be getting back to normal, it wasn’t long before everything went downhill for the former White House intern.

Once it was discovered that Lewinsky was having an affair with Clinton, the FBI forced the young staffer to be part of the bureau investigation into the president.

Scared and unsure what to do, the activist recalled how the FBI threatened to prosecute her mother and said that both women could face up to 27 years in prison for lying about the affair.

A then-24-year-old Lewinsky demanded to call her mother while she was being held inside a Ritz Carlton hotel room for what was a 12-hour interrogation.

“You’re 24, you don’t need to call your mommy, you need to make a decision about what to do,” Lewinsky recalled one agent told her.

Unwilling to immediately cooperate with the FBI, the young staffer finally told them that she demanded to speak to either her mother or her lawyer before making the decision to wear a wire and have her personal life monitored and tapped.

But once the word of the affair was out in the open, Lewinsky admitted that the scandal was almost too much for her to handle and revealed that she contemplated committing suicide.

“There was a point for me somewhere within these first several hours where I would be hysterically crying and then I would just shut down,” she admitted. “And in the shutdown period, I just remember looking out the window and thinking the only way to fix this is to kill myself.”

An FBI agent who was involved in the case corroborated her emotions at the time and said she was “alternating between being hysterical, being angry, being abusive.”

“I just felt terrible … and I was scared … and I was mortified,’ she said while trying to regain her composure,” Lewinsky sobbed in her documentary confessional.

She also confessed that the taxing events of the scandal are what led her to confide in Linda Tripp, who eventually drew the prosecution to the fact that Clinton was indeed having an affair.

Bill Nye says Mars colonies won’t happen: ‘Are you guys high?’

Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk can forget about their dreams of colonizing and transforming Mars for human settlement, at least according to Bill Nye.

The popular science commentator told USA Today that the entire idea of making the Red Planet more Earth-like is purely the stuff of “science fiction.”

“This whole idea of terraforming Mars, as respectful as I can be, are you guys high?” Nye said. “We can’t even take care of this planet where we live, and we’re perfectly suited for it, let alone another planet.”

The science educator also ruled out the idea of living on Mars permanently.

STOLEN PICASSO WORTH $ 1M ‘FOUND’ MAY BE ELABORATE HOAX

“Nobody’s gonna go settle on Mars to raise a family and have generations of Martians,” Nye, who appears on National Geographic Channel’s series “MARS,” explained. “It’s not reasonable because it’s so cold. And there is hardly any water. There’s absolutely no food, and the big thing, I just remind these guys, there’s nothing to breathe.”

Although the National Geographic Channel series depicts humans living on Mars, Nye doesn’t agree with it.

“People disagree with me on this, and the reason they disagree is because they’re wrong,” he added, noting that while scientists are even stationed on Antarctica during the cold winter months, no one lives there permanently.

Scientists have long dreamed of setting up research bases on the Red Planet. NASA even held a competition to see what such infrastructure could look like. Bezos has been a longtime proponent of space tourism and colonizing Mars via his efforts with his space exploration company, Blue Origins. Musk, who runs SpaceX in addition to Tesla, called for a colony on Mars at South By Southwest last year as a way to prevent a new dark age.

ARE THESE EARTH’S OLDEST FOSSILS OF LIFE?

Nye said living in a dome just isn’t feasible.

“When you leave your dome, you’re gonna put on another dome, and I think that will get old pretty quick,” he said. “Especially the smell in the spacesuit – all the Febreze you can pack, I think it will really help you up there.”

The Red Planet does share some similarities with Earth, such as ice caps and seasons, and has captured the imagination of humanity since the dawn of the space age.

But as for the exploration of Mars, Nye is on board.

“I want to find evidence of life on another world in my lifetime, so Mars in the next logical place to look,” he said. “People say what are you gonna find there? We don’t know, and that’s why we go and explore the unknown horizon.”

Bill Maher trashed by comic book fans for criticizing those mourning Stan Lee’s death

Bill Maher has upset a slew of comic book fans by trashing the legacy of late Marvel giant Stan Lee less than a week after his death.

The “Real Time With Bill Maher” host took to his blog to pen a cutting rebuke of those mourning the death of Lee, the co-founder of Marvel Comics responsible for creating characters such as Spider-Man, The X-Men, The Avengers and countless more.

“The guy who created Spider-Man and the Hulk has died, and America is in mourning. Deep, deep mourning for a man who inspired millions to, I don’t know, watch a movie, I guess,” he wrote. “Someone on Reddit posted, “I’m so incredibly grateful I lived in a world that included Stan Lee.” Personally, I’m grateful I lived in a world that included oxygen and trees, but to each his own.”

Maher went on to chide comic book fans noting that, when he was young, it was understood that they were just for children and that people were supposed to grow up and move on to “big-boy books without the pictures.”

“But then twenty years or so ago, something happened – adults decided they didn’t have to give up kid stuff. And so they pretended comic books were actually sophisticated literature. And because America has over 4,500 colleges – which means we need more professors than we have smart people – some dumb people got to be professors by writing theses with titles like Otherness and Heterodoxy in the Silver Surfer,” Maher wrote. “And now when adults are forced to do grown-up things like buy auto insurance, they call it ‘adulting,’ and act like it’s some giant struggle.”

The 62-year-old comedian concluded his blog post with a bit of a stretch, noting that the proliferation of comic book fans in America, in his view, led to the outcome of the 2016 presidential election.

“I don’t think it’s a huge stretch to suggest that Donald Trump could only get elected in a country that thinks comic books are important,” Maher said.

Fans were quick to speak out against Maher’s comments, including those that work in comic book writing.

“Bill Maher dismissed an entire storytelling medium? Wow. He’s so highbrow. His brow is so high, there’s probably less room for a mind,” wrote Tom Taylor, bestselling writer of “Injustice: Gods Among Us” and “X-Men: Red.”

“Newsflash: Bill Maher is still a dip—-,” wrote “Southern Bastards” and “Spider-Gwen” creator Jason Latour.

“I never speak on topics I know little or nothing about. Why? I never want to be the fool. In other words, I don’t wanna make a Bill Maher out of myself,” wrote Greg Capullo, an illustrator who has worked on “Batman,” “Spawn,” “X-Force” and more.

Despite his rhetoric, it’s worth noting that Maher was featured in one of the comic book-based movies that he’s trashing. The host previously had a cameo in “Iron Man 3” where he pretended to comment on the political ramifications of the Iron Patriot armor.

Trump-backed prison reform bill to overhaul controversial ‘three strikes’ rule

From a man who was sentenced to life after stealing $ 150 worth of videotapes to an offender sentenced for shoplifting a jacket worth $ 159, new prison reform tries to overhaul the controversial “three strikes” law that led to people spending their life in prison for petty crimes.

President Trump on Wednesday announced his support for a bipartisan reform of federal sentencing guidelines, an ambitious effort to fix decades-old and punitive justice system.

The First Step Act, which will still need to pass the Senate, will overhaul the country’s criminal justice sentencing for the first time in a generation and support rehabilitation efforts for federal prisoners and allow judges to exercise more discretion when sentencing nonviolent offenders, particularly for drug offenses

“We’re all better off when former inmates can receive and re-enter society as law-abiding, productive citizens,” Trump said. “And thanks to our booming economy, they now have a chance at more opportunities than they’ve ever had before.”

“We’re all better off when former inmates can receive and re-enter society as law-abiding, productive citizens.”

— President Trump

The bill is particularly welcomed for reforming the federal three strikes rule that mandates a life sentence for three or more convictions. Under the new legislation, the convictions would trigger a 25-year sentence instead.

The three strikes rule, introduced by then-President Bill Clinton, has long been criticized for exploding U.S. prison population and the prison system costs, while being an ineffective way to combat crime.

But the rule ruined the lives of people who were sentenced to life or long sentences despite committing meager crimes, with their tragic stories showcasing the system’s human cost.

Leandro Andrade, for example, a nine-year military veteran and a father-of-three, was sentenced in 1996 to life in prison with no parole for 50 years under the three strike rule.

His last crime was stealing videotapes worth around $ 150, including mostly children’s movies, from Kmart stores in San Bernardino.

Such crime would ordinarily be deemed as petty theft and one could get away with a fine, but because Andrade had two convictions, both of which were non-violent burglary charges, the videotape theft was prosecuted as a felony on two counts.

Andrade appealed the sentence, with a lower court agreeing that the punishment for shoplifting was a disproportionate punishment, but the ruling was overturned by the Supreme Court that found the sentence not disproportionate because Andrade could still be out on parole, NPR reported.

Republican. Sen. Lindsey Graham celebrated Trump’s support for the reform bill, saying it would give second chance to thousands of people while making more space to imprison actual violent criminals.

“Wouldn’t it be ironic if it was Donald Trump who fixed the problems created by the three strikes, you out rule passed by Bill Clinton?” Graham told Fox News’ Sean Hannity earlier this week. “Wouldn’t it be ironic it was Donald Trump and the Republican Congress working with Democrats that allowed just thousands of African-American and Hispanic males a second chance for nonviolent offenses? And create bed space for truly violent people.”

“Wouldn’t it be ironic if it was Donald Trump who fixed the problems created by the three strikes, you out rule passed by Bill Clinton?”

— Republican. Sen. Lindsey Graham

The case of Timothy Jackson is another example of how the three strikes sentencing rule ends up punishing people.

Jackson is serving life without parole for shoplifting a jacket worth $ 159 in 1996. He received the harshest sentence thanks to a juvenile conviction of unarmed robbery and two car-burglary convictions.

“It has been very hard for me,” Jackson wrote to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) for its 2013 report on non-violent offenders being sentenced for life.

“I know that for my crime I had to do some time, but a life sentence for a jacket value at $ 159. I have met people here whose crimes are a lot badder with way less time,” he said.

Timothy Jackson is serving life without parole for shoplifting a jacket worth $  159 in 1996. He received the harshest sentence thanks to a juvenile conviction of unarmed robbery and two car-burglary convictions.

Timothy Jackson is serving life without parole for shoplifting a jacket worth $ 159 in 1996. He received the harshest sentence thanks to a juvenile conviction of unarmed robbery and two car-burglary convictions. (ACLU/Jackson Family)

Paul Carter of New Orleans is also serving life without parole after police searched him in 1997 believing he was about to make a drug sale on the street.

The police found that Carter, who was suffering from drug addiction, had a clean needle and such a small amount of heroin that it couldn’t even be weighed by the authorities.

He was convicted for the possession of heroin but due to his two prior convictions more than eight years ago – simple escape when he was only 18-years-old and possessions of stolen property when he was 21 – he received a life sentence.

Paul Carter of New Orleans is also serving life without parole after police searched him in 1997 believing he was about to make a drug sale on the street.

Paul Carter of New Orleans is also serving life without parole after police searched him in 1997 believing he was about to make a drug sale on the street.

Such cases aren’t just remnants of the 1990s when the crime rate was spiraling in cities, prompting police to exercise tough policing and courts to issue harsh sentences.

Fate Vincent Winslow is serving life without parole after being caught with two bags of marijuana worth $ 10 in 2008.

Winslow, who was homeless at the time, was approached by an undercover agent who asked him to buy marijuana worth $ 10, promising to give him $ 5 commission. Winslow claims bought the drugs from a white man named Perdue, a transaction witnessed by the undercover agent.

Winslow was found guilty of marijuana distribution, while the white supplier wasn’t even arrested, according to the ACLU report.

He was sentenced to life in prison due to his prior convictions that include a simple burglary in 1984 when he was a teenager, another simple burglary, in which he didn’t actually steal anything, in 1994, and for possession of cocaine in 2000.

According to the ACLU report, Winslow is too poor for an attorney and has filed his unsuccessful post-conviction appeals by himself. He told the organization that he’s trying to “learn how to get out” and prays “every day all day … just living day by day waiting to die in prison.”

Many critics of the harsh sentencing laws point out that it disproportionately affects minorities and those involved with drug-related crimes.

But the three strikes law also applies to white-collar crimes. In 2012, A California man was sentenced to 25 years to life in prison for tricking five elderly people into unknowingly granting him title to their homes, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Timothy Barnett’s sentencing was especially harsh because he has been previously convicted of similar charges. “Three strikes should never be used in a case like this,” Barnett’s lawyer said. “It’s another reason the law should be amended.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Bill Nelson concedes Florida Senate race to Rick Scott after manual recount

Florida’s long-time Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson conceded to Republican challenger Rick Scott Sunday, drawing the hotly contested race to represent the Sunshine State to a close after 12 days of legal wrangling.

According to the Florida Secretary of State’s office, Scott led Nelson by approximately 10,000 votes after the state’s 67 counties completed machine and manual recounts

Nelson, who served three terms in the U.S. Senate, met his match in Scott, who launched a competitive campaign for Florida votes. Scott said Nelson called him to “graciously” concede and that Scott, in turn, thanked Nelson for his years of service. Scott has now won narrow victories in three statewide races since 2010.

“Now the campaign truly is behind us, and that’s where we need to leave it,” Scott said. “We must do what Americans have always done: come together for the good of our state and our country.”

President Trump congratulated Scott on Twitter Sunday, saying that Scott “was a great Governor and will be even a greater Senator in representing the People of Florida.”

The apparent victory also marks the first time in more than a century that Florida has two Republican senators representing them in Washington. The state is scheduled to certify results in the race on Nov. 20.

Election Day results showed Nelson trailing Scott by more than 56,000 votes. Scott’s lead narrowed to 12,603 votes after a statewide machine recount. The new numbers triggered an automatic hand recount under Florida law.

It’s unclear what Nelson’s plans will be post-race. The 76-year-old was first elected to office in a state House district near Cape Canaveral in 1972. He’s served three terms in the Florida House, six terms in Congress and was Florida’s insurance commissioner after Hurricane Andrew swept the Miami area.

Sunday’s hard-fought conclusion comes after a series of election missteps – in Broward and Palm Beach counties in particular — that put Florida back in the national spotlight.

After getting off to a slow start, embattled Broward County Supervisor of Elections Brenda Snipes boasted Thursday about making the state’s deadline for machine recounts.

“We are excited to be at this point,” she said Thursday afternoon.

A few hours later, election officials were forced to admit the county had uploaded the results of the recount two minutes after the state’s 3 p.m. cutoff — making its machine recount tally void.

“Basically, I just worked my ass off for nothing,” Joseph D’Alessandro, Broward County’s election planning and development director, said.

D’Alessandro said he had a hard time uploading the results in time because he wasn’t familiar with the website used to send them to the secretary of state.

When asked what would happen if Broward missed Sunday’s deadline, county attorney Drew Myers inhaled deeply and told Fox News he couldn’t even entertain the idea.

“They have to make that deadline,” he said.

Broward’s bungled recount efforts had many calling for Snipes to step down, including former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush.

“There is no question that Broward County Supervisor of Elections Brenda Snipes failed to comply with Florida law on multiple counts, undermining Floridians’ confidence in our electoral process,” Bush tweeted on Monday. “Supervisor Snipes should be removed from her office following the recounts.”

Protesters have been camped outside Broward’s Lauderhill recount site since last Sunday.

Some carried signs that read, “Corrupt Snipes!!! Lock Her Up!” “Busted Brenda” and “I trust [Michael] Avenatti more than Brenda!” while shouting at election officials, counter-protesters and the news media.

President Trump also sounded off on Snipes, telling The Daily Caller, “When they call this woman incompetent, they’re wrong. She’s very competent but in a bad way.”

On Tuesday, Snipes said she’s considering leaving after the recount.

“It is time to move on,” she said. “I haven’t finalized that. I’ll just check with my family. They’ll tell me what I’m doing.”

Like Broward, Palm Beach County also missed its machine recount deadline.

Election supervisor Susan Bucher said the county found “dozens of precincts missing a significant number” of votes and indicated there may be entire boxes of ballots that weren’t counted, according to a report in the New York Times.

She also blamed the county’s issues on mechanical errors and said the scanning machine overheated. It got so bad that she had to fly in two mechanics to fix the problem. The technicians, though, witnessed Palm Beach County workers jam a paper clip into the scanner’s “enter” button to slow the high-speed scanner down. That action caused a short circuit that cut off the power.

U.S. District Judge Mark Warner, who heard several legal challenges filed in connection to the recount, slammed state lawmakers and Palm Beach County officials for failing to anticipate election problems and said the state law on recounts appears to violate the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that decided the presidency in 2000.

“We have been the laughingstock of the world, election after election, and we chose not to fix this,” Walker said in court.

While there have been no estimates yet on how much the 2018 recount will cost, past recounts have racked up a hefty bill.

In 2000, Citizens Against Government Waste released a report that estimated the costs associated with the state’s recount efforts. CAGW estimated Palm Beach County blew through $ 25,000 a day and projected the 2000 recount cost in Broward, Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties to be more than $ 2 million.

Fox News’ Sarah Chakales, Ivonne Amor and Gregg Re contributed to this report.

Bill Nelson concedes in Florida Senate race vs. Rick Scott

Florida’s long-time Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson conceded Sunday to Republican challenger Rick Scott in the hotly contested race to become the next U.S. senator to represent the Sunshine State.

Scott was leading Nelson by 10,000 votes in the race to become the next U.S. senator to represent Florida, official results showed Sunday.

Nelson, who served three terms in the U.S. Senate, met his match in Gov. Rick Scott. The victory will be Scott’s third close statewide win in less than a decade.

The victory also marks the first time in more than a century that the Sunshine State has two Republican senators representing them in Washington. The state is scheduled to certify results in the race on Nov. 20.

Election Day results showed Nelson trailing Scott by more than 56,000 votes. Scott’s lead narrowed to 12,603 votes after a statewide machine recount. The new numbers triggered an automatic hand recount under Florida law.

It’s unclear what Nelson’s plans will be post-race. The 76-year-old was first elected to office in a state House district near Cape Canaveral in 1972. He’s served three terms in the Florida House, six terms in Congress and was Florida’s insurance commissioner after Hurricane Andrew swept the Miami area.

Sunday’s hard-fought conclusion comes after a series of election missteps – in Broward and Palm Beach counties in particular — that put Florida back in the national spotlight.

After getting off to a slow start, embattled Broward County Supervisor of Elections Brenda Snipes boasted Thursday about making the state’s deadline for machine recounts.

“We are excited to be at this point,” she said Thursday afternoon.

A few hours later, election officials were forced to admit the county had uploaded the results of the recount two minutes after the state’s 3 p.m. cutoff — making its machine recount tally void.

“Basically, I just worked my ass off for nothing,” Joseph D’Alessandro, Broward County’s election planning and development director, said.

D’Alessandro said he had a hard time uploading the results in time because he wasn’t familiar with the website used to send them to the secretary of state.

When asked what would happen if Broward missed Sunday’s deadline, county attorney Drew Myers inhaled deeply and told Fox News he couldn’t even entertain the idea.

“They have to make that deadline,” he said.

Broward’s bungled recount efforts had many calling for Snipes to step down, including former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush.

“There is no question that Broward County Supervisor of Elections Brenda Snipes failed to comply with Florida law on multiple counts, undermining Floridians’ confidence in our electoral process,” Bush tweeted on Monday. “Supervisor Snipes should be removed from her office following the recounts.”

Protesters have been camped outside Broward’s Lauderhill recount site since last Sunday.

Some carried signs that read, “Corrupt Snipes!!! Lock Her Up!” “Busted Brenda” and “I trust [Michael] Avenatti more than Brenda!” while shouting at election officials, counter-protesters and the news media.

President Trump also sounded off on Snipes, telling The Daily Caller, “When they call this woman incompetent, they’re wrong. She’s very competent but in a bad way.”

On Tuesday, Snipes said she’s considering leaving after the recount.

“It is time to move on,” she said. “I haven’t finalized that. I’ll just check with my family. They’ll tell me what I’m doing.”

Like Broward, Palm Beach County also missed its machine recount deadline.

Election supervisor Susan Bucher said the county found “dozens of precincts missing a significant number” of votes and indicated there may be entire boxes of ballots that weren’t counted, according to a report in the New York Times.

She also blamed the county’s issues on mechanical errors and said the scanning machine overheated. It got so bad that she had to fly in two mechanics to fix the problem. The technicians, though, witnessed Palm Beach County workers jam a paper clip into the scanner’s “enter” button to slow the high-speed scanner down. That action caused a short circuit that cut off the power.

U.S. District Judge Mark Warner, who heard several legal challenges filed in connection to the recount, slammed state lawmakers and Palm Beach County officials for failing to anticipate election problems and said the state law on recounts appears to violate the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that decided the presidency in 2000.

“We have been the laughingstock of the world, election after election, and we chose not to fix this,” Walker said in court.

While there have been no estimates yet on how much the 2018 recount will cost, past recounts have raked up a hefty bill.

In 2000, Citizens Against Government Waste released a report that estimated the costs associated with the state’s recount efforts. CAGW estimated Palm Beach County blew through $ 25,000 a day and projected the 2000 recount cost in Broward, Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties to be more than $ 2 million.

Fox News’ Sarah Chakales, Ivonne Amor and Gregg Re contributed to this report. 

Monica Lewinsky says she was ‘gutted’ after Bill Clinton labeled her ‘that woman’ in doc: ‘I felt anger’

Monica Lewinsky endured many mortifying moments in her life — one of them was reading Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr’s report in 1998 online, which detailed his investigation on her affair with then-President Bill Clinton.

Lewinsky, 45, provided an in-depth reflection about her relationship with Clinton in a six-part docuseries for A&E titled “The Clinton Affair” from Academy Award and Emmy-winning producer Alex Gibney’s Jigsaw Productions and Emmy-winning director Blair Foster.

The special aims to examine the jaw-dropping events that led to the now-72-year-old’s impeachment, which took place on Dec. 19, 1998.

Lewinsky and her parents, as well as those close to Clinton, including former senior advisor Sidney Blumenthal and former lawyer Bob Bennett, participated in the documentary. Foster previously told The Hollywood Reporter that while the Clintons are aware of the project, they were not involved with the series.

MONICA LEWINSKY TELLS ALL

An attorney for the Clintons did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

In the documentary, the former White House intern shared how horrified she was reading Starr’s sexually explicit report, which described her encounters with Clinton. She was worried about how her family was going to be impacted by public scrutiny.

“I felt terrible for Mrs. Clinton, I felt awful for Chelsea [Clinton],” Lewinsky admitted. “It was such a raw exposure.”

Lewinsky was a 21-year-old recent college graduate from Los Angeles when she began working at the White House as an unpaid intern in July 1995. She revealed that between August to October, she and Clinton shared a number of “flirtatious encounters.” However, things escalated in November 1995 during the federal government shutdown.

MONICA LEWINSKY: WHY I DID IT

President Bill Clinton shakes his finger as he denies improper behavior with Monica Lewinsky, in the White House Roosevelt Room. "I did not have sexual relations with that woman," Clinton said. First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton stands by her man.

President Bill Clinton shakes his finger as he denies improper behavior with Monica Lewinsky, in the White House Roosevelt Room. “I did not have sexual relations with that woman,” Clinton said. First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton stands by her man. (Getty)

After the story broke, Clinton publicly denied the allegations and famously declared, “I did not have sexual relations with that woman, Ms. Lewinsky.”

She said the speech left her stunned.

“I was gutted,” she explained. “I felt anger. I was hurt, having been called ‘that woman.’ But at the same time, there was a part of me that was glad he did that. Because I wanted him to deny it. I did not want him to lose his job. You know, it was impossible to imagine what was about to unfold.”

Lewinsky said she was frustrated by how she was being negatively depicted by the press. Lewinsky also shared she was unable to publicly defend herself from the media backlash as the case unfolded.

DOCU-SERIES OPENS OLD WOUNDS FOR BILL CLINTON RAPE ACCUSER JUANITA BROADDRICK

(Courtesy of A&E)

“I was alleged to have been saying I was going to D.C. to get my presidential kneepads, which I never said,” she said. “… People started to chip away at my integrity and my character… I was crushed by the lack of any support in the media… There didn’t seem to be too much humanity… It just knifed me. But because I was under legal quarantine, I couldn’t even speak for myself. “

In January 1998, Lewinsky’s confidant Linda Tripp called the Office of the Independent Counsel (OIC) and revealed she knew about the affair, offering them taped conversations. The OIC then made Tripp set up a meeting with Lewinsky at the Ritz-Carlton. There, Lewinsky was ambushed by FBI agents and taken to a hotel room where she was held by waiting prosecutors from the OIC until late in the night.

Lewinsky was offered immunity if she cooperated with the prosecution.

“The first time anybody had ever heard my voice was I think when they released the Tripp tapes,” she said. “They were aired in their entirety on C-SPAN… It was just like a whole other layer of just being burned.”

(Reuters)

On Dec. 19, 1998 the House voted to impeach Clinton for lying under oath to a federal grand jury and obstructing justice. On Feb. 12, 1999 the Senate acquitted Clinton, who would go on to finish his term.

Lewinsky said that while she tried to move on after the scandal, she was still ridiculed by the press, making it difficult for her to find work.

“I had a handbag company and I had some other projects,” she said. “But eventually, that just wasn’t fulfilling me… It’s a very long period of floundering and feeling unbelievably stuck in the old narrative of Monica Lewinsky that was created. It’s affected my family in a lot of really tough ways over the years… It was one of the aspects for which I felt really guilty about what happened. Because it also meant they could never escape it either. “

Lewinsky would go on to graduate from the London School of Economics in 2007 with a Master’s degree in social psychology. Today, she is a contributing editor for Vanity Fair and an anti-bullying activist.

(Courtesy of A&E)

“Thank God at least the last few years I’ve had some opportunities to make positive contributions of it, so when younger generations and their families grow up there’s not just this horrible history,” she said.

“I never could have imagined the impact that this would have on others, on the presidency, on my life and of course, the country,” Lewinsky added. “… Though my life has moved on in ways that I am incredibly grateful… the consequences and the pain that was caused was enormous.”

Lewinsky was interviewed over 20 hours for the 6 1/2-hour documentary. More than 50 people associated with the scandal also provided insight. In an essay published by Vanity Fair on Tuesday, Lewinsky admitted to feeling guilt and shame in reliving her time at the White House on camera and had wondered whether participating in the documentary was the right decision for her.

In June of this year, Clinton faced criticism for announcing in an interview with NBC’s Craig Melvin that he didn’t believe he should have to apologize directly to Lewinsky because he had publicly apologized 20 years ago.

Bill Clinton

Bill Clinton (Reuters)

But Lewinsky thinks Clinton “should want to apologize” to her.

“I’m less disappointed by him, and more disappointed for him,” she wrote. “He would be a better man for it… and we, in turn, a better society.

Lewinsky also explained that, even though she has already apologized to Hillary and Chelsea during an interview with Barbara Walters in 1999, she would be grateful for the chance to personally reach out to Hillary, 71.

“And if I were to see Hillary Clinton in person today, I know that I would summon up whatever force I needed to again acknowledge her — sincerely — how very sorry I am,” Lewinsky wrote. “I know I would do this because I have done it in other difficult situations related to 1998. I have also written letters apologizing to others — including some who also wronged me gravely. I believe that when we are trapped by our inability to evolve, by our inability to empathize humbly and painfully with others, then we remain victims ourselves.”

(AP)

“The Clinton Affair” premieres Sunday, Nov. 18 on A&E.

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